Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 1st Jun 2011 22:38 UTC
Internet & Networking Because OSNews is technically a site from the US, and because the technology industry is decidedly a US-centric industry, we often talk about US politics having adverse effects on technology - or, the other way around. That's why I've been detailing the political movements here in The Netherlands with regards to net neutrality. After a lot of positive news, I've now got some bad news - bad news that involves the largest political party trying to block net neutrality - because one of its members of parliament, Afke Schaart, is a former KPN employee. And yes, KPN is the carrier that first announced it was going to block and throttle traffic.
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Comment by Kasi
by Kasi on Wed 1st Jun 2011 23:09 UTC
Kasi
Member since:
2008-07-12

I think what you are doing is probably the best and only method for attempting change. The more attention that is drawn to these relationships, and the more the subtle manipulative tactics of large corporations are exposed to the public is the only hope for gaining a decent counter movement.

However assuming they get their way like always have before, is this something that can be manipulated by using an encrypted proxy service?

Reply Score: 3

RE: Comment by Kasi
by Lennie on Wed 1st Jun 2011 23:28 in reply to "Comment by Kasi"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

I think there is always a way, but it shouldn't be necessary.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by Kasi
by Adurbe on Thu 2nd Jun 2011 21:38 in reply to "Comment by Kasi"
Adurbe Member since:
2005-07-06

I suppose this might not be a popular view on this story, but I think its IMPORTANT to have elected officials who have worked in real industries. Certainly I vastly prefer those to 'professional politicians'.

The UK parliament is sorely lacking people who truly understand IT technology. If they did, we wouldn't have made the 'universal broadband' rollout at 2mb due to complete in 2012...

That said, one would Hope that they would use their knowledge to bring expertise to the debate and not just maintain old loyalties.

If you dont agree with how your elected official votes. Don't vote for them next time round.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by Kasi
by Alfman on Fri 3rd Jun 2011 01:58 in reply to "RE: Comment by Kasi"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Adurbe,

"I suppose this might not be a popular view on this story, but I think its IMPORTANT to have elected officials who have worked in real industries. Certainly I vastly prefer those to 'professional politicians'."

Yes, but there's also a concern in having representatives who still have active ties to the industry.

In the US I see the obama administration placing a bunch of high profile corporate CEOs in government positions with some oversight over their own companies.

Eric Schmit, Google CEO
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jamie-court/google-ceo-for-commerce-s...

Andrew McLaughlin, Google director
http://www.informationweek.com/news/government/enterprise-architect...

Dick Costolo, Twitter CEO.
http://www.freepress.net/news/2011/5/27/twitter-ceo-named-president...

Jeffrey Immelt, GE CEO
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/01/21/obama-picks-jeffrey-immel-...

I haven't been keeping track, but the list of corporate directors actually pretty long, these are just the ones I remember recently.

Facebook, like the rest, are buying their way into politics.
http://www.npr.org/2011/05/30/135783156/facebook-has-powerful-frien...


I know it's a tough balancing act, but having all the corporate bigwigs appointed to oversee government policy over their own industries is becoming hard to stomach. Is there anybody in government representing "joe the plumber" (or joe the STEM worker for that matter)?

Edited 2011-06-03 02:05 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2