Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 1st Jun 2011 22:38 UTC
Internet & Networking Because OSNews is technically a site from the US, and because the technology industry is decidedly a US-centric industry, we often talk about US politics having adverse effects on technology - or, the other way around. That's why I've been detailing the political movements here in The Netherlands with regards to net neutrality. After a lot of positive news, I've now got some bad news - bad news that involves the largest political party trying to block net neutrality - because one of its members of parliament, Afke Schaart, is a former KPN employee. And yes, KPN is the carrier that first announced it was going to block and throttle traffic.
Thread beginning with comment 475567
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
DHofmann
Member since:
2005-08-19

If charging more for certain kinds of traffic means the carrier doesn't have to raise prices across the board, why is that a bad thing?

You may not like a la carte pricing, but some people do. Please don't take away the freedom and ability of those less wealthy than you to economize.

Reply Score: 1

Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

DHofmann,

"If charging more for certain kinds of traffic means the carrier doesn't have to raise prices across the board, why is that a bad thing?"

I personally don't mind paying for what I use, my phone bill currently works out that way. I also don't mind non-discriminatory QOS controls which give low bandwidth customers priority over high bandwidth customers on an hourly or daily basis (as long as it's fairly advertised).


What I do object is the ISP deciding to discriminate against customers using their bandwidth to do X in favor of customers using their bandwidth to do Y. It's none of their business what I do with my fair share of bandwidth. One might even go so far as to say they shouldn't even have the legal right to wiretap it at all, and shouldn't even know which protocols I'm running.

Reply Parent Score: 5

DHofmann Member since:
2005-08-19

It's none of their business what I do with my fair share of bandwidth.


Unless, of course, you allow them to, in exchange for a lower bill. Why would you restrict people's freedoms and force them to pay higher bills?

Reply Parent Score: 1

Berend de Boer Member since:
2005-10-19

Alfman: What I do object is the ISP deciding to discriminate against customers using their bandwidth to do X in favor of customers using their bandwidth to do Y. It's none of their business what I do with my fair share of bandwidth

Alfman, what I object to is car companies selling my only cars with radios that play mp3, not ogg. I think the government should step in and regulate this. I feel hurt!

Edited 2011-06-02 05:20 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 0

abcxyz Member since:
2009-07-30

One might even go so far as to say they shouldn't even have the legal right to wiretap it at all, and shouldn't even know which protocols I'm running.


Interesting question. I wonder if back in the days our "free market" proponents would suggest it's OK to have their letters casually scanned... so that service provider (and trucks owner) can charge accordingly for love, business letters, birthday cards, condolences...

Reply Parent Score: 4