Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 29th May 2011 21:29 UTC, submitted by teigetje
Microsoft It turns out that a lot of people haven't been paying attention. Over the weekend, a story about how Microsoft is earning more from HTC's Android devices than from its own Windows Phone 7 sales spread all across the web, with surprised reactions everywhere. Anyone who has been paying attention to Microsoft's recent patent trolling regarding Android could've seen this coming.
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Alfman
Member since:
2011-01-28

japh,

"Can you show me that law? Does it say anything about long term or short term? Does it say you have to make as much money as possible no matter what it does to the public image of the company?"

It sounded funny to me too.

It's boardmember's responsibility to act in the interests of shareholders. But it's the shareholder's responsibility to elect (or fire) the board members.

For this reason, I think it's unlikely we'll ever find corporate board members who are against software patents. That view would likely prevent them from getting elected to the board in the first place.

And, I have to admit, this is an excellent (though selfish) reason for business people to speak about software patents favorably, it keeps more doors open for themselves.

Reply Parent Score: 2

japh Member since:
2005-11-11


It's boardmember's responsibility to act in the interests of shareholders. But it's the shareholder's responsibility to elect (or fire) the board members.


This is closer to the truth. But there is a conflict there. Shareholders wants quick profits while the board also have to look at what happens to the company in the long run.
Example: Microsoft wanted to buy yahoo. It would have been a quick win for the shareholders, but yahoo themselves felt that in the long run it was smarter not to sell.
Those in charge aren't in jail today, so I will have to assume that they didn't break any laws by not giving the shareholders the quick profit they wanted.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

japh,

"This is closer to the truth. But there is a conflict there. Shareholders wants quick profits while the board also have to look at what happens to the company in the long run."

I agree that there is a tendency for short term thinking. But, the board are hired by shareholders to work for them.

"Example: Microsoft wanted to buy yahoo. It would have been a quick win for the shareholders, but yahoo themselves felt that in the long run it was smarter not to sell."

Well, if I remember, it was Yang specifically acting as CEO who made the decision not to sell. And I think he let his personal pride get in the way. Shareholders could have fired Yang immediately, but he was himself a pretty large shareholder and carried a lot of pull.

"A filing from April 2009 shows that Yang had 33.6+ million shares in indirect ownership of Yahoo!"

http://247wallst.com/2010/02/11/jerry-yang-dumping-yahoo-shares-yho...


"Those in charge aren't in jail today, so I will have to assume that they didn't break any laws by not giving the shareholders the quick profit they wanted."

I doubt he broke any laws, but he did loose his job and probably his career (not that he really needs a job now-a-days).

Reply Parent Score: 2