Linked by lemur2 on Fri 3rd Jun 2011 22:24 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu Netbook innovator Asustek has announced that it will ship three models of its Eee PC with Ubuntu 10.10 preinstalled. Canonical announced Asus' decision to load the Eee PC 1001PXD, 1011PX and 1015PX with Ubuntu 10.10 from 1 June as one that will "make it one of the most user-friendly PCs on the market". Asus said that "many more" Eee PC models running Ubuntu will be available later this year. Linux fans will hope that in the three years since Asus started shipping Linux on its Eee PCs users will have realised that Linux is far more lightweight and suited to netbook computing than Windows.
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RE: Year of the Linux Desktop..
by Neolander on Sat 4th Jun 2011 07:49 UTC in reply to "Year of the Linux Desktop.."
Neolander
Member since:
2010-03-08

How about the year of the Linux Laptop ?

There is little evidence so far that tablets can be good at actually productive tasks, and laptops sound like the logical evolution of the desktop for persons who can deal with their smaller screen and don't change any hardware but RAM and mass storage devices.

Edited 2011-06-04 07:50 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RichterKuato Member since:
2010-05-14

Right now, Desktop Linux isn't very good at productive tasks either. Unless you're willing to use workarounds like Wine (which may not work) for legacy support or change over all your productivity software to the less popular Linux equivalents (if they exist).

Tablets will eventually get there because they are popular enough with the general public for developers to support those platforms. Industry standard applications (eg. Adobe Creative Suite, Pro Tools, Microsoft Office, AutoCad, Rosetta Stone) will be available for Android/iOS way before a Desktop Linux version is even considered.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

No, no, what I'm talking about is a fundamental incompatibility of current tablet hardware (relatively small finger-based touchscreen with no stylus support) with productive tasks.

Let's face it, Photoshop for iOS is nowhere near the capabilities of the desktop/laptop version. Question is, could it even be, while using such a low-powered interface ?

Of course, you are right that the tablet productivity problem might still be solved before the mythical Year of the Linux Desk... err... Laptop happens ;)

Edited 2011-06-04 14:10 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 0

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Right now, Desktop Linux isn't very good at productive tasks either. Unless you're willing to use workarounds like Wine (which may not work) for legacy support or change over all your productivity software to the less popular Linux equivalents (if they exist).


Linux is perfectly good at productive tasks.

There are over 100,000 applications which run on Linux. Something to suit almost everyone's needs, and certainly everything that one would reasonably want to do on a netbook.

To support your outrageos claim, your challenege is to name some task (suited to a netbook configured to run Linux) that Linux would not allow people to do. This will prove impossible for you o do.

Reply Parent Score: 4

gilboa Member since:
2005-07-06

Right now, Desktop Linux isn't very good at productive tasks either. Unless you're willing to use workarounds like Wine (which may not work) for legacy support or change over all your productivity software to the less popular Linux equivalents (if they exist).


You forgot to add: "For me, Desktop Linux..."
For a home users (like many people around me), Linux/Firefox/LibreOffice is far better than the equivalent (Bootlegged Windows + Old Office + whatever IE that came with the non-upgrade-able due to WGA).
More-ever, the change between Office 2000/XP/2K3 and LibreOffice 3.x is far less radical compared to moving to the ribbon based Office 2K7/2K10.

Never the less, I do agree that using Linux on the desktop requires two things:
1. Availability of comparable software.
2. Time.

Switching OS, any OS takes time to master.

- Gilboa

Edited 2011-06-05 16:59 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Right now, Desktop Linux isn't very good at productive tasks either. Unless you're willing to use workarounds like Wine (which may not work) for legacy support or change over all your productivity software to the less popular Linux equivalents (if they exist). Tablets will eventually get there because they are popular enough with the general public for developers to support those platforms. Industry standard applications (eg. Adobe Creative Suite, Pro Tools, Microsoft Office, AutoCad, Rosetta Stone) will be available for Android/iOS way before a Desktop Linux version is even considered.


I have already pointed out that BricsCAD is a perfectly viable alternative to AutoCAD, and that LibreOffice is a perfectly viable alternative to Microsoft Office.

However, CAD is a high-end application that no-one in their right mind would be running on a netbook. As for Pro Tools ... along with MS office, these are applications that one might actually have a use for on a netbook, providing the price was right. But Pro Tools? ... the software alone would cost as much again as the netbook.

Here is a capable solution, software included, for the price of a netbook hardware alone:
http://createdigitalmusic.com/2008/11/indamixx-laptop-is-first-pre-...

Edited 2011-06-06 02:40 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

Right now, Desktop Linux isn't very good at productive tasks either.

Well that depends entirely on what your job is.


Unless you're willing to use workarounds like Wine (which may not work) for legacy support or change over all your productivity software to the less popular Linux equivalents (if they exist).

Less popular != less productive

I use OpenOffice for everything and never ran into a hitch. In fact OO Calc is actually better than Excel for working with CSV files. OO Writer is better for working with PDFs

Industry standard applications (eg. Adobe Creative Suite, Pro Tools, Microsoft Office, AutoCad, Rosetta Stone) will be available for Android/iOS way before a Desktop Linux version is even considered.

Professional suites are an extreme end of the spectrum used by a relatively small niche of people.

The reality is most people don't need Photoshop, AutoCad or Pro Tools. They don't even want that level of complexity - they'd sooner use something simpler and quicker to learn.
Those that do need professional suites will also need beefier systems than netbooks and the majority of laptops. So they wouldn't be buying these EeePCs anyway. Thus your examples are silly.

Reply Parent Score: 2