Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 3rd Jun 2011 22:26 UTC, submitted by twitterfire
Privacy, Security, Encryption "The hacker group LulzSec on Thursday posted information it took from Sony Entertainment and Sony BMG on its site, called the LulzBoat. The information includes about a million usernames and passwords of customers in the U.S., Netherlands and Belgium and is available for download and posted on the group's site. A release posted on LulzSec's page said the group has more, but can't copy all of the information it stole. The group also said none of the information it took from Sony was encrypted."
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RE[3]: Question is...
by orestes on Sat 4th Jun 2011 13:36 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Question is..."
orestes
Member since:
2005-07-06

Don't kid yourself. There's no such thing as completely covering your tracks with something like this. The second the government starts throwing words like cyberterrorism around, all sorts of normally frowned upon avenues of investigation open up.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Question is...
by Neolander on Sat 4th Jun 2011 13:49 in reply to "RE[3]: Question is..."
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Well, imagine that you go in a public place like a university's computer room, and subtly steal someone's credentials (easy, people don't hide themselves a lot when typing logins and passwords). Then when the person has left, you log back in on the same computer, using these credentials, to perform your evil deeds, and delete every piece of software you've used if you've used some.

I can't see which data could personally identify yourself in such a scenario.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: Question is...
by WereCatf on Sat 4th Jun 2011 14:01 in reply to "RE[4]: Question is..."
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

Well, imagine that you go in a public place like a university's computer room, and subtly steal someone's credentials (easy, people don't hide themselves a lot when typing logins and passwords). Then when the person has left, you log back in on the same computer, using these credentials, to perform your evil deeds, and delete every piece of software you've used if you've used some.

I can't see which data could personally identify yourself in such a scenario.


Libraries pack several security cameras, and atleast here most of them also have separate cameras for public computer terminals. That's more than enough to catch you.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Question is...
by bert64 on Sat 4th Jun 2011 15:37 in reply to "RE[4]: Question is..."
bert64 Member since:
2007-04-23

Security cameras around the public terminals..
More cameras on the entrances/exits.
Even more cameras on the streets outside.
Witnesses since it's a public place.
Logging at the network level (even assuming you have root equivalent access to the terminal itself and have proven there is no local logging).

Of course the easiest way to avoid being caught, is to live in a country where the law doesn't care.

Reply Parent Score: 2