Linked by lemur2 on Fri 3rd Jun 2011 22:24 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu Netbook innovator Asustek has announced that it will ship three models of its Eee PC with Ubuntu 10.10 preinstalled. Canonical announced Asus' decision to load the Eee PC 1001PXD, 1011PX and 1015PX with Ubuntu 10.10 from 1 June as one that will "make it one of the most user-friendly PCs on the market". Asus said that "many more" Eee PC models running Ubuntu will be available later this year. Linux fans will hope that in the three years since Asus started shipping Linux on its Eee PCs users will have realised that Linux is far more lightweight and suited to netbook computing than Windows.
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RE: the problem is ...
by vivainio on Sat 4th Jun 2011 15:03 UTC in reply to "the problem is ..."
vivainio
Member since:
2008-12-26

moreover, most netbook buyers view them as normal laptops, just smaller, capable of running the same applications (which in turn are well beyond those for mere web browsing) and OTOH most applications a PC user has or needs are for windows
so the reality is sooner or later they'll need a windows license on their netbooks too, anyway


You hear that a lot, but I don't believe it.

People that buy netbooks usually have another computer already that they use for "real work". If that real work involves windows, the computer will have windows.

Netbook is something that sits in the living room for casual browsing. Linux can do that job better than windows (mostly because it doesn't require virus scanners that kill the performance on low end hardware).

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: the problem is ...
by Neolander on Sat 4th Jun 2011 16:02 in reply to "RE: the problem is ..."
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Hmmm, where I live I also see people use them at work, typically as a Powerpoint-projector interface.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: the problem is ...
by vivainio on Sat 4th Jun 2011 19:20 in reply to "RE[2]: the problem is ..."
vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26

Hmmm, where I live I also see people use them at work, typically as a Powerpoint-projector interface.


For work purposes, people can (and do) get non-cheap small devices as well. These asus/acer things are mostly targeted at consumers.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: the problem is ...
by silix on Sun 5th Jun 2011 22:50 in reply to "RE: the problem is ..."
silix Member since:
2006-03-01

People that buy netbooks usually have another computer already that they use for "real work".
[...]
Netbook is something that sits in the living room for casual browsing.
not always.
in fact, each and every person i know who considered getting a netbook, was going to use it as his/her *first* (yes, there exist professionals who have successfully managed to get their job done with just pen and paper till just yesterday) or anyway main, pc (a netbook, oh so compact, oh so portable, oh so cheap, would have been an ideal foray into IT for a doctor, lawyer or accountant with work to do, possibly on the go);
and either scrapped the netbook for a pentium T / i3 laptop after some months, or scrapped the idea and went for the laptop directly;
apparently, some types of people aren't so keen with having one machine for each task... like they have one office, one desk, one armchair, one photocopier, one dvd player, etc, they also see the PC as something of which to have just one, as versatile as possible

Edited 2011-06-05 22:52 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: the problem is ...
by lemur2 on Mon 6th Jun 2011 02:50 in reply to "RE[2]: the problem is ..."
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

some types of people aren't so keen with having one machine for each task... like they have one office, one desk, one armchair, one photocopier, one dvd player, etc, they also see the PC as something of which to have just one, as versatile as possible


This may be so, but it doesn't say anything at all about a need to run Windows.

Linux is, if anything, more versatile than Windows, and for price sensitive consumers, such as those who might buy a netbook, Linux wins hands down.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: the problem is ...
by Neolander on Mon 6th Jun 2011 05:56 in reply to "RE[2]: the problem is ..."
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

apparently, some types of people aren't so keen with having one machine for each task... like they have one office, one desk, one armchair, one photocopier, one dvd player, etc, they also see the PC as something of which to have just one, as versatile as possible

Well, from a maintenance and data locality point of view, it makes some sense.

Reply Parent Score: 1