Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 15th Jun 2011 14:21 UTC, submitted by aargh
Linux "Remember KQ Infotech? KQ Infotech was the Indian company that ported the ZFS file-system to Linux as an out-of-tree kernel module (after deriving the code from the LLNL ZFS Linux work) and KQ's interesting methods of engagement in our forums. The company was successful in delivering an open-source ZFS module for Linux that performed semi-well and didn't depend upon FUSE (the file-systems for user-space module) like other implementations. However, this ZFS Linux code appears to no longer be worked on by KQ Infotech."
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The1stImmortal
Member since:
2005-10-20

Whilst I know what you mean, this strikes me as something of a chicken-and-egg problem for entering the field ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Yeah, its not easy entering into the enterprise data storage market. Nor is it easy entering into the life preserving medical equipment field. A high barrier to entry is a good thing in some industries. I'll not apologize for its necessity.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

Whilst I know what you mean, this strikes me as something of a chicken-and-egg problem for entering the field ;)

Not really. You'll get hobbyists, non-production / test systems and perhaps even small start ups adopting newer technologies; trialling them for production and enterprise users. Much like bleeding edge Linux distros and users that run "unstable" (et al) repositories provide valuable testing and bug reports so that the more server-focused distros have more assurances about which packages to push into "stable" and which patches to back-port.

You just wouldn't expect an enterprise to use an unproven storage technology any more than you'd expect them to be running "unstable" / "testing" repo's on their core servers.

Reply Parent Score: 3

The1stImmortal Member since:
2005-10-20

You just wouldn't expect an enterprise to use an unproven storage technology any more than you'd expect them to be running "unstable" / "testing" repo's on their core servers.

Hmm. You shouldn't expect it perhaps. I suspect it's more common than it should be though ;)

Still - I'm no economist, but I would think industries with high barriers to entry and where economies of scale drive towards big players, would lead to oligopolies or monopolies and we all know where that ends up in IT...

Reply Parent Score: 2

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

True that. However, when the bulk of your work isn't in the mainline kernel its not going to get as many of those early adopters. Btrfs only has a chance to make it because its being used by people in less stressful/ less important situations FYI, I'm running Fedora 15 now so I'll probably be on BTRFS when 16 drops. So Yeah, I am calling my own data less important.

Reply Parent Score: 2