Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 16th Jun 2011 22:55 UTC, submitted by lucas_maximus
Linux In a blog post today, Adobe's Director of Open Source and Standards said: "we will be focusing on supporting partner implementations and will no longer be releasing our own versions of Adobe AIR and the AIR SDK for desktop Linux". McAllister says that "way back in 1999" he'd predicted "a significant market for desktop Linux by 2005. Obviously I was wrong. So we, Adobe, also need to shift with the market." Source code for AIR will be made available to partners so they can make their own Linux implementations if they so desire. Is there anyone in the audience who cares about no more AIR on Linux from Adobe? Anyone...?
Thread beginning with comment 477506
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[2]: Desktop Linux?
by MOS6510 on Fri 17th Jun 2011 10:23 UTC in reply to "RE: Desktop Linux?"
MOS6510
Member since:
2011-05-12

Why can't something that is not only superior, but also free get any serious market share?

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Desktop Linux?
by Neolander on Fri 17th Jun 2011 10:59 in reply to "RE[2]: Desktop Linux?"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Because it's not superior in the areas which matter for large-scale success in the desktop market, maybe.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Desktop Linux?
by senshikaze on Fri 17th Jun 2011 11:25 in reply to "RE[3]: Desktop Linux?"
senshikaze Member since:
2011-03-08

You mean shoved down everyone throat whether they want it or not? You got me there.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Desktop Linux?
by MOS6510 on Fri 17th Jun 2011 14:20 in reply to "RE[3]: Desktop Linux?"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

One could do an article with all the happenings, situations and events that would lead to The Year of the Linux Desktop.

Think hard and you will come up with a pretty long list when something did or did not happen causing a united cheer amongst Linux users claiming victory.

For example the long wait for Longhorn and the eventual Vista mess. Two (related) events that Linux faithful claimed would cause people and businesses to switch to Linux. Or Novell taking over SuSE, finally Linux would have global support and become a serious player. Even Bill Gates announcing he would like to get more involved in the technical bit caused some to claim this would be good for Linux growth. Cities switching to Linux (it has started) and switching back (oh well). Ubuntu giving away Linux cds, now it was too easy to get Linux and install it.

And related to Linux in a way, what about OpenOffice vs Microsoft Office? How many times did we hear "How can you compete with something that's free?".

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Desktop Linux?
by No it isnt on Fri 17th Jun 2011 11:40 in reply to "RE[2]: Desktop Linux?"
No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

It's not superior in the right segments. I mean, saying desktop Linux is superior for productivity compared to iOS isn't really relevant for the success of iOS, since its success is based on being great for consumer gadgets, pushing content -- at a price! -- to buyers. Desktop Linux certainly isn't a good consumer OS, lacking as it is in support from the content industry.

My point was simply that if those gadgets are ready to compete with the traditional desktop, then so has Linux been for quite some time. Or, in other words: those over-hyped things of the future that supposedly will take over everything aren't nearly ready for that, but that doesn't seem to influence perception. And Linux, despite providing a very usable desktop and in many respects being far easier to set up, maintain and use than Windows 7 (even when Windows comes pre-installed), has never had that kind of hype.

Perception is hugely important in the market, but people are often wrong. VHS won instead of Beta, Windows instead of OS/2, the Germans are closing their nuclear plants, etc.

Luckily, Linux doesn't depend on a huge market share in order to thrive. As long as it has a fair share of developers (it does), it will get new software and updates to the old.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Desktop Linux?
by Soulbender on Fri 17th Jun 2011 14:55 in reply to "RE[2]: Desktop Linux?"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

One word: marketing.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Desktop Linux?
by westlake on Fri 17th Jun 2011 23:33 in reply to "RE[2]: Desktop Linux?"
westlake Member since:
2010-01-07

Why can't something that is not only superior, but also free get any serious market share?


Apple and Microsoft have over thirty years experience building and marketing systems and software for non-technical end users.

Apple sells an upscale urban lifestyle. Microsoft, solid middle class values. Ideological purity or political correctness is not part of the deal -- and that in itself is liberating.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Desktop Linux?
by jbauer on Sat 18th Jun 2011 00:37 in reply to "RE[2]: Desktop Linux?"
jbauer Member since:
2005-07-06

Why can't something that is not only superior, but also free get any serious market share?


Because its superiority is and has always been bullshit.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Desktop Linux?
by draethus on Tue 21st Jun 2011 13:32 in reply to "RE[2]: Desktop Linux?"
draethus Member since:
2006-08-02

Why can't something that is not only superior, but also free get any serious market share?


In his book "After the software wars," Keith Curtis says:

"For example, Intel claims to be a strong support of Linux, but is doing only a decent job in its support of Linux drivers. An Intel engineer told me at a Linux conference that their Linux efforts are just 1% of the
manpower that their Windows efforts receive. Doubling their Linux development team would cost less than .1% of their total R&D."

Intel probably won't invest more because they don't see a big future in the Linux desktop. In other words, Linux isn't gaining market share, because it has so little market share.

Reply Parent Score: 1