Linked by jwilliamsep on Wed 22nd Jun 2011 14:32 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes We've taken the next step in Internet connectivity, and have IPv6-enabled this site for testing purposes. Of course, this will only work if your ISP or some third-party gateway provides you with IPv6 connectivity, which you can check here. If you're all set, try the IPv6 OSnews out at http://ipv6.osnews.com/ and let us know if you have any trouble with it.
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Hmmm
by jgagnon on Wed 22nd Jun 2011 15:38 UTC
jgagnon
Member since:
2008-06-24

I'm using Windows 7 with IPv6 enabled and I still can't get to the site from work. Would that mean my local network or my ISP is not up to speed (assuming I did everything correctly for Windows 7)?

Edited 2011-06-22 15:46 UTC

Reply Score: 1

RE: Hmmm
by PhilPotter on Wed 22nd Jun 2011 15:41 in reply to "Hmmm"
PhilPotter Member since:
2011-06-10

Most likely explanation is your ISP doesn't support IPv6 (it is switched on in later versions of Windows by default but the infrastructure still has to support it). I myself use a Hurricane Electric tunnel which seems to work quite well, and shall give OSNews a test when I'm home from work :-)

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Hmmm
by Drumhellar on Wed 22nd Jun 2011 18:02 in reply to "Hmmm"
Drumhellar Member since:
2005-07-12

First, check your router. Most home routers don't support IPv6 yet. Generally speaking, the only time your home router will support IPv6 is if you were specifically looking for that as a feature.

Next, the modem you use with your service also has to support it. I'm not sure how common these are, or if IPv6-capable service providers give them out by default or not.

Finally, your ISP has to support it. If you're using Comcast, your out of luck (unless you happen to be one of a couple thousand people in 1 of 5 cities).

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Hmmm
by WorknMan on Wed 22nd Jun 2011 21:10 in reply to "Hmmm"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

I can't browse the site from home using AT&T DSL. The test site says:

You appear to have no IPv6 address.

It looks like you have only IPv4 Internet service at this time. Don't feel bad - most people are in this position right now. Most Internet service providers are not quite yet ready to provide IPv6 Internet to residential customers.


So I guess I'm shit outta luck for now ;) Don't know if my router supports it... not really curious enough to check into it.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Hmmm
by bassbeast on Sat 25th Jun 2011 17:04 in reply to "Hmmm"
bassbeast Member since:
2007-11-11

It is your ISP, I'm willing to bet my last dollar on it. As a PC builder and repairman I've been trying to get up to speed on IP V6 but have learned the hard way that until the ISPs jump on board it is a waste of time and talking to my local ISP I get "IP V6, what's that?" so I doubt we'll be seeing it any time soon.

Talking to the head of my cableco he told me flat footed that at current growth rates my cableco could easily go another decade and a half without exhausting their current addresses, and that isn't counting the possibility of NAT. But even with every cable box on 24/7 he said their dynamic address pool has a good decade plus before being depleted and as long as the VAST majority of routers (seriously go look at Newegg. The vast majority of routers sold to consumers RIGHT NOW doesn't support IP V6 and most likely never will) and other consumer gear support IP V4 only the support nightmare makes IP V6 a non starter.

Personally i think the moron that designed IP V6 to not be backwards compatible (by say using a 6to4 wrapper or other encapsulation) should be stood in the village square and have rotten fruit thrown at him as it makes adoption by those that already have large amount invested in IP V4 a mess. I personally doubt we'll see the majority of ISPs switch over until the late teens at the earliest.

And honestly if we would demand that those sitting on huge swaths of IP V4 addresses cough them up or spend a buck a month to keep them? We wouldn't be having this problem and would have time for an orderly switch out, as less than 35% at last count of IP V4 addresses are being used, the rest are squatters and those that got huge class As back when the net was born.

So as someone who lives in a flyover state let me say this: It is gonna be bad folks. Most of the experienced net guys are retiring rather than deal with the headache that is IP V6, years of outsourcing has left IT in most places badly short handed as an American would have to be insane to go into IT anymore,not to mention the lousy pay makes it not worth the effort, and because the few guys that are left are both short handed and have ZERO experience with the tech problems that would take a few hours to diagnose and fix with IP V4 will take days or even weeks with IP V6. It is gonna be a mess folks, really REALLY ugly. I can see why most ISPs are pretending IP V6 doesn't exist as it is gonna cost them some serious $$$ to do the switchover and all the failures are gonna have folks screaming bloody murder.

Reply Parent Score: 1