Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 22:51 UTC
Mac OS X "Apple has now released Mac OS X 10.6.8, the eighth maintenance update for Snow Leopard, via Software Update. The update offers a number of fixes implemented since the release of Mac OS X 10.6.7 in late March."
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Bill Shooter of Bul
Member since:
2006-07-14

No, I don't support that from a consumer's perspective. You should use a system until its no longer able to do the tasks you require of it. As time progresses there are new tasks that arise that require more computational power (video editing, parallel processing expiraments, virtual machines) which cause machines to be obsoleted. But this is different than just turning to a box and saying " You're old I'm not using you any more because of your age." . I mean people do that, but its a waste of money, IMHO. Now in the past the necessary upgrade cycles were much shorter, but recently we've hit a plateau where we can keep machines much longer. My desktop upgrade cycle (from 1991 in years between upgrades 4,3,3,8.

Now, from a OS developer's perspective sometimes there are things that are beneficial that necessitate raising the hardware requirements. Sometimes its bloat, sometimes its Good stuff, sometimes its cost of development. I don't blame apple for not wanting to continue to support a six year old processor architecture which doesn't gain them much in revenues any longer.

Reply Parent Score: 2

MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

You can keep on using your Mac, even without (security) updates.

There aren't many attacks on OS X, let alone on a minority of Mac owners using an OS version and architecture that will be pretty rare.

Just my theory of course. But I do wonder if you put a Windows NT 3.51 server on-line (for example), will it get hacked by scripts scanning the net for vulnerable systems?

It's not a likely target you'd come across, nor would you expect it to have any important data/services on it.

So I doubt any hackers or script kiddies would look for those.

I still have a G3 iMac somewhere running Panther (OS X 10.3) and I use it as a SSH terminal, some light surfing, mail and chat.

Reply Parent Score: 1

malxau Member since:
2005-12-04

You can keep on using your Mac, even without (security) updates.
...
I still have a G3 iMac somewhere running Panther (OS X 10.3) and I use it as a SSH terminal, some light surfing, mail and chat.


I think a lot depends on the applications. OS X has always had a good firewall and doesn't expose ports willy-nilly. If it's a well firewalled client connecting to SSH or well known mail/chat servers, the risk isn't very high. Browsing the web (or rendering HTML mail) on Safari 1.2 or FireFox 2 is probably much more risky, since the security holes tend to be cumulative and (for FireFox) frequently cross-platform.

Reply Parent Score: 2