Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 24th Jun 2011 14:42 UTC, submitted by vivainio
Windows "Early milestone builds of Windows 8 have leaked onto the Internet, and considerable effort has been put into figuring out how they work. Though officially tight-lipped, snippets of information have escaped Redmond's walls. So far, it appears that Windows 8 development doesn't just look not bad - there are signs that it will actually resolve many long-standing annoyances with writing Windows software. If Microsoft can pull off everything it's hoping to achieve with the platform, Windows 8 will be as important and radical a release as Windows Longhorn was going to be." Fantastic article by Ars' Peter Bright. His stance on H264 and WebM may boil my blood at times, but this is a good piece of writing. Highly recommended.
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RE: Ho, ho, ho
by computrius on Fri 24th Jun 2011 22:27 UTC in reply to "Ho, ho, ho"
computrius
Member since:
2006-03-26

"The only thing that I would request is being able to access DirectX from managed code. "

I thought you could already. Isnt that what XNA is all about?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Ho, ho, ho
by Nelson on Fri 24th Jun 2011 23:40 in reply to "RE: Ho, ho, ho"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Not quite. DirectX is an immediate mode API, XNA is a retained mode.

The difference is that XNA is many, many levels of abstractions above DirectX, and quite slower. Though easier to work with.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Ho, ho, ho
by n4cer on Sun 26th Jun 2011 02:36 in reply to "RE[2]: Ho, ho, ho"
n4cer Member since:
2005-07-06

Not quite. DirectX is an immediate mode API, XNA is a retained mode.

The difference is that XNA is many, many levels of abstractions above DirectX, and quite slower. Though easier to work with.


XNA is not retained mode. That's WPF/WPF3D.
XNA is managed interface to a subset of DirectX (D3D9 as far as graphics). Its precursor was called Managed DirectX. IIRC, XNA (vs Managed DX) improved the API to fit better with common .NET patterns, added a content pipeline to make asset management easier, added support for the Xbox 360 as a build target, and also incorporated the Xbox's input and audio APIs. ZuneHD was later added as a build target, and more recently, Windows Phone. A somewhat limited version of XNA (Reach Profile) is the API for Silverlight 3D in Silverlight 5 (currently in beta).

Access to DirectX 10+ functionality is currently available to managed code via the Windows API CodePack

http://archive.msdn.microsoft.com/WindowsAPICodePack

http://windowsteamblog.com/windows/b/developers/archive/2010/04/27/...

Edited 2011-06-26 02:39 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2