Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 26th Jun 2011 18:01 UTC, submitted by Debjit
KDE "KDE has released a release candidate of the upcoming 4.7 release of the Plasma Desktop and Netbook workspaces, the KDE Applications and the KDE Frameworks, which is planned for July 27, 2011. With API, dependency and feature freezes in place, the KDE team's focus is now on fixing last-minute showstopper bugs and finishing translation and documentation that comes along with the releases." Focuses of this release are Kwin support for OpenGL-ES 2.0 (oooh purty!), an interface refresh for Dolphin, and loads of other stuff.
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RE: ...
by Elv13 on Sun 26th Jun 2011 22:17 UTC in reply to "..."
Elv13
Member since:
2006-06-12

KDE is not a Linux distribution. KDE4 live demo DVD do not seem to exist anymore. It was nice to have before KDE4 was usable to see the progress, but there is no point now. It was never intended to be a fully supported distribution, but rather a proof of progress. If you want to try KDE, the best way is to create a separated user account and use the cmakekdefull bash script or something else to compile it for you. Like that you will have an "unstable" KDE version trapped into an user account (no real installation required).

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: ...
by UltraZelda64 on Mon 27th Jun 2011 03:50 in reply to "RE: ..."
UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

Compiling even the smallest programs can be a massive pain in the ass. I wouldn't want to see a complete desktop compile (that is, assuming it will compile without you pulling all your hair out in the first place...). Not to mention all the time required, even if it did work successfully.

I would actually recommend just waiting for KDE 4.7 to officially be released, and soon enough distros will start shipping it. And certainly at least a few of them will be live CDs/DVDs. And of course they will all implement it somewhat differently and with their own finishing touches, some of them better, some worse--which IMO is definitely better than having one standard sub-par set of binaries with the same exact feel (or in other words, one distribution). KDE hasn't been making too many huge changes though, so I doubt that anything new is truly groundbreaking.

I have to admit though, I was wondering "why the f*** would you want to integrate a desktop environment with a bootloader, and how the hell would you integrate it with such a low-level piece of software?," and once I read why and saw the screenshot, I thought that's pretty cool. But still... not groundbreaking, because the only difference is that you select the OS before rebooting instead of after. Very cool, but not amazing. It seems like every new release is full of those things, little things that aren't groundbreaking, but they add up and really give you feeling that the desktop is very fresh and full-featured.

Edited 2011-06-27 04:01 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: ...
by sorpigal on Mon 27th Jun 2011 12:04 in reply to "RE[2]: ..."
sorpigal Member since:
2005-11-02

Compiling small programs is, in fact, not a pain at all. Compiling big, complex programs can be only because of (1) the time involved and (2) the fact that large projects have large dependency lists, some of which you may not have.

Properly written build scripts will make detecting depenencies that you need simple and compiling once you have them merely a matter of waiting (and not running out of disk space).

That said, I don't think KDE4 is a good place to start if you've never compiled your own software before.

Reply Parent Score: 4