Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 24th Jun 2011 22:46 UTC
In the News As we reported earlier this week, Apple is busy sending out cease and desist letters to small, defenceless projects to defend its trademark application (it doesn't actually own the trademark yet) for 'app store'. This has prompted many a discussion over the trademarkability of such a generic term, and over the origins of the abbreviation 'app'. Who came up with it? How old is it? To my surprise - the abbreviation is much older than you'd think, and in a way, it illustrates quite well the demise of the programmer. What? Read on.
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RE[2]: This is a red herring
by Glynser on Tue 28th Jun 2011 12:15 UTC in reply to "RE: This is a red herring"
Glynser
Member since:
2007-11-29

It is not the same.

There have been tons of shopping malls around (and book stores, computer shops, food stores, etc to all those other commentors), so it's obvious you can't take the term as a trademark for shopping malls.

But have you EVER seen an app store before?

There was never an "app store", no one ever used the term "app store", so one can definitely invent the name "App Store" and use it for his newly created "app store". Those were "download portals" before, or whatever you called them, but certainly not "app stores".

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: This is a red herring
by tupp on Tue 28th Jun 2011 17:20 in reply to "RE[2]: This is a red herring"
tupp Member since:
2006-11-12

But have you EVER seen an app store before?

There was never an "app store", no one ever used the term "app store", so one can definitely invent the name "App Store" and use it for his newly created "app store". Those were "download portals" before, or whatever you called them, but certainly not "app stores".

Wow...

The basic difference between most of the Internet "download portals" and the Iphone app store is that one has to pay for apps in the Iphone app store. These "portals" are commonly called "repositories" in the Linux/BSD world, and they predate the Iphone app store by at least a decade.

Another difference between the Iphone app store and Linux/BSD repositories is the way in which the apps are accepted and maintained, but it is not necessary to go into that discussion here.

However, there were Linux app stores in which the user paid for the apps in the repository. The most notable one was Lindows/Linspire's "Click-N-Run": http://www.urtech.ca/2011/03/apple-you-didnt-invent-the-app-store/

The Click-N-Run app store predates Apple's attempt by at least five years, with 9 million applications installed from a library of more than 45,000 titles.

So, a Linux, paying app store had been invented (and even "popularized") years before the Iphone app store.

Edited 2011-06-28 17:23 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: This is a red herring
by Alfman on Tue 28th Jun 2011 17:29 in reply to "RE[2]: This is a red herring"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

"But have you EVER seen an app store before?"

I think your a little too close to apple to see the big picture, let's try something else:

Have you ever seen a wig store before?
If wigs were to come in vogue again, it would be ridiculous to grant exclusive rights to the generic term "wig store" such that all the merchants who want to sell wigs would be unable to use the most obvious term to describe their store.

They'd have to play stupid games to try and avoid the generic terms which customers would most likely try to look them up under. No entity should be entitled to use generic terms exclusively.

Reply Parent Score: 2