Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 29th Jun 2011 15:04 UTC
Apple Well, this just got interesting. There's been a bit of a backlash over Apple's Final Cut X Pro, which is considered a step down from previous versions by many professional videographers, as they claim it lacks countless features - leading to the nickname 'iMovie Pro'. Former Shake product designer and former Apple employee Ron Brinkmann has now weighed in on the situation. His advice to professionals? Don't rely on companies like Apple.
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RE: Apple is getting arrogant
by Kroc on Wed 29th Jun 2011 15:37 UTC in reply to "Apple is getting arrogant"
Kroc
Member since:
2005-11-10

Yup, with so much profit and enough cash in the bank to buy most of the mobile industry (or the film industry), they're clearly dying from this mistake.

Wake up, move on people, before it gets nasty. The Mac is a quarter of their business. iOS is the new thing and you pros don’t matter. You’re legacy. You’re being phased out.

Long live the prosumer!

Reply Parent Score: 2

molnarcs Member since:
2005-09-10

Yup, with so much profit and enough cash in the bank to buy most of the mobile industry (or the film industry), they're clearly dying from this mistake.

Wake up, move on people, before it gets nasty. The Mac is a quarter of their business. iOS is the new thing and you pros don’t matter. You’re legacy. You’re being phased out.

Long live the prosumer!


Now that was a bit harsh, wasn't it? It's kinda awful that it rings so true...

Reply Parent Score: 2

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Well, except, of course, for the fact that professional users are reliable. Consumers (and 'pro-sumer' is a bullshit word some consumers use because they know how to find certain buttons in Photoshop) are fickle, and all it takes is the next best thing not to come out of Cupertino and shits will hit fans.

Just look at Nintendo.

Ignoring customers that have been with you since day one, through thick and thin, is never a good idea - even if you don't rely on them anymore. The world is a harsh place, especially the hip and trendy consumer market, and as the great Yahtzee once said about Nintendo - "al it takes is a few Virtual Boys" and Nintendo is back at square one. And lo and behold, that's exactly what's happening right now.

Apple is relying on a group of customers that will, surely, for the coming years provide them with decent sales. However, these customers largely resemble magpies, and will jump onto the next shiny object when it arrives. They're a fickle crowd.

Especially for that reason it is incredibly short-sighted from Apple to treat its professional customers this way - let's face it, it was these people that ploughed them through their dark ages. Kicking them out now seems like an incredibly stupid thing to do - even it doesn't hurt the bottom line right now.

Reply Parent Score: 3

CaptainN- Member since:
2005-07-07

Ignoring the hardcore gamer market with Wii seems to have paid off quite well.

Reply Parent Score: 1

kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

I think Thom you're being a bit mellow dramatic - the only thing Apple did do wrong with the launch of Final Cut Pro X was the failure to provide the FAQ when it was launched and prematurely stopping the sale of Final Cut Pro 7 to those people who rely on it (they should have kept selling it and provided a free upgrade to Final Cut Pro X who wanted it once the features they need had been added). They re-wrote it from the ground up and failed to communicate with the customer base, both existing and potential, that it was a clean slate and many features that might have existed in version 7 had to be re-written. The lack of communication by Apple has always been a killer but this goes back to this paranoia Steve Jobs has about making a 'big splash' with 'lots of razzle dazzle'.

With that being said Apple is developing for the pro segment of the market but they aren't going to be dictated to by 0.0001% of the marketplace who sit there pointing their finger and screaming across the table demanding xyz features to be added. Microsoft has been the bitch for the enterprise market for 20+ years that has pretty much crippled any expansion beyond the Office/Windows duo (yes, they do offer middleware but it pales in comparison to the duo of Office and Windows) - Yes I am happy that Apple is going to focus on the bulk 95% of end users out there rather than pandering to the niche 5% whose demands never corresponded to an equal volume of purchases to cover the costs.

Lion is a testament to the new 'business approach' given the features they've added - do you add all the crap that so-called 'power users' want or do you fix up Finder to address long standing complaints that come from real end users - you know, normal people who use their computer on a regular basis? I mean, good lord, you swear as though some people on the internet have a lofty sense of entitlement believing that some how Apple owes them - last time I checked when I bought my Mac I wasn't signing up for a cult, support group or an unpaid member of the 'Army for the protection of Apple'.

Reply Parent Score: 3

tanzam75 Member since:
2011-05-19

Just because the pro market stayed loyal to Apple does not mean that Apple wants to stay loyal to them. They'd be happy to throw away their pro customers if they get 10x as many prosumers. It's business. The software sells for the same amount of money, either way.

Ironically, the whole idea of a prosumer is based on selling dreams that will later be shattered. For every person who makes it big in Hollywood thanks to the democratization of production tools, there are 100 waitresses who are shelling out real money to chase their dreams in film/TV. Final Draft, for example, costs as much as the home edition of the Microsoft Office suite.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Apple is getting arrogant
by Lennie on Wed 29th Jun 2011 16:16 in reply to "RE: Apple is getting arrogant"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

Funny you mentioned the film industry, the harddisk manufacturers-industry is also bigger than the music and film industry combined.

I always thought that was funny, with them complaining about piracy and all that ;-)

Reply Parent Score: 2

tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

Do you have a reference to back up that claim?

Reply Parent Score: 2

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Yup, brand and corporate loyalty is for suckers.

Also, the word prosumer is stupid but then again prosumers are mostly people who think they know more than they do so it's quite fitting that it's stupid.

Edited 2011-06-29 16:20 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

The pros that kept Apple alive weren't using Apple applications on top of classic Mac OS. They were using third party applications on Mac OS. Apple started investing in third party applications when classic was dying and OSX was new. It was a requirement to help keep the whole platform ( classic and OSX) alive as third party apps were starting to baulk at continuing classic aps and/or porting to a completely.

So yes, its stupid to rely on Apple as a media app developer. No, its not stupid to rely on them as a OS provider for media apps.

I would say the same for Microsoft as well ( Expression Studio for example).

Reply Parent Score: 3

JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Absolutely agree with that statement. Apple do not hide the fact that they don't care about professionals and enterprise.

But calling Apple's customers prosumers is giving too much credit to most Apple's customers. The absolute majority of their customers are by definition consumers. And Apple is making sure that they stay that way...

Reply Parent Score: 5

Sabon Member since:
2005-07-06

Absolutely agree with that statement. Apple do not hide the fact that they don't care about professionals and enterprise.

But calling Apple's customers prosumers is giving too much credit to most Apple's customers. The absolute majority of their customers are by definition consumers. And Apple is making sure that they stay that way...



And how is this different than users on any other operating system other than maybe UNIX? It is certainly true for Windows and game consoles, etc. Very few people are "developers" / "Pros". Based on that, Microsoft is arrogant too.

As for Apple not supporting the enterprise. They tried with XServe to break into the low end sever market and did not succeed.

Approach #2 is to basically do what Microsoft and IBM did with PCs and then servers. First get users to use Apple products at home and then have them want to use them at work too. This is happening now. Once enough people use Apple computers at home and at work then Apple may reconsider about servers again.

On that last note, I think that Apple would be more inclined, server wise, to do more of what Amazon is doing by hosting applications on their servers for companies instead of rolling out Apple servers for companies to install inside their own computer networks. Obviously I'm not Steve Jobs so I can only speculate.

Reply Parent Score: 2

seishino Member since:
2005-09-10

To be fair, OSX had a lock on the high-end video market while Windows couldn't go above 4 GB of RAM. Your options were a custom and expensive Unix based system, or a Mac.

Now that Windows has hit a proper 64 bits, the biggest platform in the world suddenly is viable.

Reply Parent Score: 1