Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 29th Jun 2011 15:04 UTC
Apple Well, this just got interesting. There's been a bit of a backlash over Apple's Final Cut X Pro, which is considered a step down from previous versions by many professional videographers, as they claim it lacks countless features - leading to the nickname 'iMovie Pro'. Former Shake product designer and former Apple employee Ron Brinkmann has now weighed in on the situation. His advice to professionals? Don't rely on companies like Apple.
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Thom_Holwerda
Member since:
2005-06-29

Well, except, of course, for the fact that professional users are reliable. Consumers (and 'pro-sumer' is a bullshit word some consumers use because they know how to find certain buttons in Photoshop) are fickle, and all it takes is the next best thing not to come out of Cupertino and shits will hit fans.

Just look at Nintendo.

Ignoring customers that have been with you since day one, through thick and thin, is never a good idea - even if you don't rely on them anymore. The world is a harsh place, especially the hip and trendy consumer market, and as the great Yahtzee once said about Nintendo - "al it takes is a few Virtual Boys" and Nintendo is back at square one. And lo and behold, that's exactly what's happening right now.

Apple is relying on a group of customers that will, surely, for the coming years provide them with decent sales. However, these customers largely resemble magpies, and will jump onto the next shiny object when it arrives. They're a fickle crowd.

Especially for that reason it is incredibly short-sighted from Apple to treat its professional customers this way - let's face it, it was these people that ploughed them through their dark ages. Kicking them out now seems like an incredibly stupid thing to do - even it doesn't hurt the bottom line right now.

Reply Parent Score: 3

CaptainN- Member since:
2005-07-07

Ignoring the hardcore gamer market with Wii seems to have paid off quite well.

Reply Parent Score: 1

JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Ignoring the HC gamer market is exceptionally profitable. Yet 2 years down the road, when the casual gamer starts requiring the same stuff that HC gamer requires today, you'll feel the heat. It's the same as enthusiast class PC components; today it's overpriced e-penis extension tool, tomorrow it's in every midrange PC.


With the price of XBox360 and PS3, Wii can hardly compete today. MS and Sony just brought in the causal gamer into their platforms, while Wii will never get the hardcore gamer on their side.

Reply Parent Score: 4

Valhalla Member since:
2006-01-24

Ignoring the hardcore gamer market with Wii seems to have paid off quite well.


That's just Thom showing off his usual bias. Because the 3DS hasn't sold aswell as the DS did Thom sees the opportunity to spell doom and disaster for Nintendo. It's getting old.

It's true that NDS (and Gameboy Advance before that) totally dominated the handheld game market, but obviously there are tougher times now with the mobile phone segment moving in hard aswell as the PSP having gained alot of ground with a strong software lineup.

So no, I can't see the 3DS sell nearly as good as the DS did, but only those with agendas (like Thom) will try to translate this into Nintendo 'being back on square one'.

Reply Parent Score: 2

kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

I think Thom you're being a bit mellow dramatic - the only thing Apple did do wrong with the launch of Final Cut Pro X was the failure to provide the FAQ when it was launched and prematurely stopping the sale of Final Cut Pro 7 to those people who rely on it (they should have kept selling it and provided a free upgrade to Final Cut Pro X who wanted it once the features they need had been added). They re-wrote it from the ground up and failed to communicate with the customer base, both existing and potential, that it was a clean slate and many features that might have existed in version 7 had to be re-written. The lack of communication by Apple has always been a killer but this goes back to this paranoia Steve Jobs has about making a 'big splash' with 'lots of razzle dazzle'.

With that being said Apple is developing for the pro segment of the market but they aren't going to be dictated to by 0.0001% of the marketplace who sit there pointing their finger and screaming across the table demanding xyz features to be added. Microsoft has been the bitch for the enterprise market for 20+ years that has pretty much crippled any expansion beyond the Office/Windows duo (yes, they do offer middleware but it pales in comparison to the duo of Office and Windows) - Yes I am happy that Apple is going to focus on the bulk 95% of end users out there rather than pandering to the niche 5% whose demands never corresponded to an equal volume of purchases to cover the costs.

Lion is a testament to the new 'business approach' given the features they've added - do you add all the crap that so-called 'power users' want or do you fix up Finder to address long standing complaints that come from real end users - you know, normal people who use their computer on a regular basis? I mean, good lord, you swear as though some people on the internet have a lofty sense of entitlement believing that some how Apple owes them - last time I checked when I bought my Mac I wasn't signing up for a cult, support group or an unpaid member of the 'Army for the protection of Apple'.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Sauron Member since:
2005-08-02

Kaiwai
(Lion is a testament to the new 'business approach' given the features they've added - do you add all the crap that so-called 'power users' want or do you fix up Finder to address long standing complaints that come from real end users - you know, normal people who use their computer on a regular basis?)

Why not do both? Most other companies do. Then again, most other companies don't have a dictator at the top!

Reply Parent Score: 1