Linked by martini on Wed 29th Jun 2011 09:50 UTC
OS/2 and eComStation OpenJDK had been released as GA for OS/2 and eComStaion. This allows eCS-OS2 users to run modern Java apps on their platform. The development is open source and had been in part sponsored by donations of the community.
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RE[6]: Java apps?
by pantheraleo on Wed 29th Jun 2011 20:15 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Java apps?"
pantheraleo
Member since:
2007-03-07

Kdevelop is as much of an IDE as I need. A "More powerful" Ide doesn't do me any good if it consumes too much memory, is too slow, and suffers from stability and display integrity problems.


How much memory is too much? IDEA on my system typically uses around 200 Mb. I don't think that's bad for an IDE. And I've seen Firefox use more than that at times. Also, I don't have any slowness or stability problems with it either. It's a a little slow to start-up because of all the plugin modules it loads. But once it is running, it's plenty fast.

I didn't mean they look bad, just that they perform poorly. Native applications run with in virtual machines run smoother than java applications on local host.


That hasn't been true for a long time now. The only time Java is really slower is on application start-up. Once the application is running, they are just about as fast as native applications.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Java apps?
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Wed 29th Jun 2011 20:32 in reply to "RE[6]: Java apps?"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

How much memory is too much? IDEA on my system typically uses around 200 Mb. I don't think that's bad for an IDE. And I've seen Firefox use more than that at times. Also, I don't have any slowness or stability problems with it either. It's a a little slow to start-up because of all the plugin modules it loads. But once it is running, it's plenty fast.


It varies depending on the system. But using a ton of memory is a problem for Java applications as it will trigger more frequent garbage collections which I think may be behind some of the sluggish behaviour. To be honest I only accuse an app of taking up too much memory when I notice system wide slowdowns and or swapping. Eclipse is sluggish, so maybe I attribute that to memory, when it could just be the GUI speed problem regardless of memory.

For comparison Kdevelop is using 98 Mb right now. SlickEdit worked great on my 7 year old system with 128 mb total.

That hasn't been true for a long time now. The only time Java is really slower is on application start-up. Once the application is running, they are just about as fast as native applications.


That's true today on my year old system.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: Java apps?
by pantheraleo on Wed 29th Jun 2011 22:35 in reply to "RE[7]: Java apps?"
pantheraleo Member since:
2007-03-07

It varies depending on the system. But using a ton of memory is a problem for Java applications as it will trigger more frequent garbage collections which I think may be behind some of the sluggish behaviour.


Well, keep in mind that by default, Java limits itself to 256Mb of heap space. If you find that an app is sluggish and seems to do a lot of garbage collection, you can increase the amount of heap space that the JVM is allowed to use. Allowing it to use 512Mb is often suggested for complex apps like IDEs. You can set that with the -Xmx option.


To be honest I only accuse an app of taking up too much memory when I notice system wide slowdowns and or swapping. Eclipse is sluggish, so maybe I attribute that to memory, when it could just be the GUI speed problem regardless of memory.


It's very possibly what I mentioned above. Even if you have 4GB or more of RAM in your system. the JVM by default will not use more than 256Mb unless you tell it that it is OK.

Garbage collection usually doesn't cause slowdowns in most desktop applications because Java tries to do it as an idle task when the application isn't doing much of anything else. And of of course, desktop applications spend a lot of idle time waiting for the user to do something.

For comparison Kdevelop is using 98 Mb right now. SlickEdit worked great on my 7 year old system with 128 mb total


Sure. but again, Kdevelop doesn't have nearly the power or features that Eclipse does. I prefer IDEA myself, so I'm not that familiar with Eclipse settings. But you can reduce memory usage by disabling unneeded modules in Eclipse. For example, if you don't do Enterprise Web development, you can disable the EE modules. If you don't need SQL database support, you can disable the SQL support modules. You can also disable version control modules for version control systems you aren't using, and so on.

Reply Parent Score: 2