Linked by David Adams on Thu 30th Jun 2011 15:55 UTC, submitted by Jennimc
Apple Newly published results show Apple's newly adopted Thunderbolt technology blows FireWire 800 out of the water with data transfer speeds to an external RAID system at 700MB/s.
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Where's eSATA?
by CodeMonkey on Thu 30th Jun 2011 16:47 UTC
CodeMonkey
Member since:
2005-09-22

The comparison they test is Thunderbolt vs USB 2.0 vs FireWire 800. If we're talking an external RAID array then I would argue that neither USB 2.0 nor FireWire 800 are appropriate interfaces. I'd be much more interested in seeing comparisons between Thunderbolt vs USB 3.0 vs eSATA, both of which would be more reasonable interfaces to an external RAID box.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Where's eSATA?
by rob_mx on Thu 30th Jun 2011 17:59 in reply to "Where's eSATA?"
rob_mx Member since:
2005-08-04

Well, thunderbolt is only available in apple hardware now, and they don't have eSata nor USB3. So they can not do a comparison against them using the same hardware.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Where's eSATA?
by ourcomputerbloke on Thu 30th Jun 2011 23:46 in reply to "RE: Where's eSATA?"
ourcomputerbloke Member since:
2011-05-12

Well, thunderbolt is only available in apple hardware now, and they don't have eSata nor USB3. So they can not do a comparison against them using the same hardware.


http://www.lacie.com/more/index.htm?id=10112
http://www.sonnettech.com/product/tempo-x_esata8.html

I can tell you where it ISN'T: any computer sold by Apple.


http://store.apple.com/us/product/H1113LL/A

Doesn't Thunderbolt technology scale to fibre? The current implementation on Macs is the copper implementation I thought? eSATA / USB 3.0?

PPC, NuBus, ADC, Firewire


From what I read all of these at the time were / are still technically significantly superior to those that were ultimately adopted by the industry? I wouldn't be surprising though. My observation and opinion is that the industry generally approaches things from a perspective of "make whatever's cheapest so we can sell it as cheap as possible to beat the competition". Just a personal opinion though.

Another view is that the industry didn't go the way of some of these technologies because they were convinced not to by another rather large player who at the time had significantly more cash available to throw around. Maybe a bit conspiracy theory'ish, but in this industry certainly not out of the question.

Also, didn't the first Macs to come out with Firewire onboard already have USB? I thought USB 2.0 was nowhere to be seen in the wild at the time, and due to it's reliance on the processor to do all the work, unlike the industry standard IEEE1394, USB was considered to put too much load on the processors of the day in cases of critical or time dependent data transfers? And isn't Firewire chainable, and ADB, and Thunderbolt, with the ability to chain devices of different speeds without affecting other devices on the bus?

Maybe I read wrong.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Where's eSATA?
by pilotgi on Thu 30th Jun 2011 18:00 in reply to "Where's eSATA?"
pilotgi Member since:
2005-07-06

The eSATA tests are coming up. This is according to macworld.com.

Edited 2011-06-30 18:08 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Where's eSATA?
by BallmerKnowsBest on Thu 30th Jun 2011 20:26 in reply to "Where's eSATA?"
BallmerKnowsBest Member since:
2008-06-02

Where's eSATA?


I can tell you where it ISN'T: any computer sold by Apple.

It's the same old hilarious pattern that Apple has been repeating for over two decades now.

1) Instead of adopting the industry standard technology, they reinvent their own version of the wheel (PPC, NuBus, ADC, Firewire, and now Thunderbolt).

2) Apple announces the competing solution which that they're developing/adopting, and their tout it as being 50x faster than the competition.

3) Apple's "mee tooo" solution fails miserably when the initial hype turns out to be bullshit, no one else adopts the tech outside of Apple & it's only kept afloat by Apple out of embarrassment "Not Invented Here"

4) With tail tucked firmly between their legs, Apple has to adopt the industry standard (x86/x64, PCI/AGP, VGA/DVI, USB2, and whatever technology inevitably beats Thunderbolt), in the process screwing over everyone gullible enough to buy into their competing, incompatible solution.

Reply Parent Score: -1

RE[2]: Where's eSATA?
by phoenix on Thu 30th Jun 2011 22:07 in reply to "RE: Where's eSATA?"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

1) Instead of adopting the industry standard technology, they reinvent their own version of the wheel (PPC, NuBus, ADC, Firewire, and now Thunderbolt).


Didn't NuBus predate PCI and FireWire predate USB? Not sure how you can spin that as "Apple doing their own thing instead of using the 'industry standard'".

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Where's eSATA?
by kefkathecruel on Fri 1st Jul 2011 03:07 in reply to "RE: Where's eSATA?"
kefkathecruel Member since:
2006-01-17

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thunderbolt_(interface)

1. Please do note that Intel is the designer of the Thunderbolt technology. So much for Apple reinventing the wheel.

2. Thunderbolt is far faster than USB 3.0 and other competing technologies.

3. Again it isn't Apple's solution but rather comes from Intel. Apple is merely an early adopter. Firewire was adopted by dozens of corporations whose CEOs are responsible for managing in one year more money than you will ever see in your life.

4. Apple moved to embrace industry standards with the CHRP platform in the mid 90s and has been evolving toward more standard hardware ever since. On the matter of compatibility I can legally run Windows, Linux, Mac OS X, and pretty much any other operating system on my MacBook. I can run Windows apps side by side with KDE and MS Office for Mac. Can you say the same for your Dell laptop?

Fail troll is fail.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Where's eSATA?
by Soulbender on Fri 1st Jul 2011 05:00 in reply to "RE: Where's eSATA?"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Thunderbolt was created by Intel and is owned by Intel.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Where's eSATA?
by BluenoseJake on Fri 1st Jul 2011 13:51 in reply to "RE: Where's eSATA?"
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

Thunderbolt was designed by Intel, google Light Peak

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Where's eSATA?
by demetrioussharpe on Sat 2nd Jul 2011 20:40 in reply to "RE: Where's eSATA?"
demetrioussharpe Member since:
2009-01-09

1) Instead of adopting the industry standard technology, they reinvent their own version of the wheel (PPC, NuBus, ADC, Firewire, and now Thunderbolt).


4) With tail tucked firmly between their legs, Apple has to adopt the industry standard (x86/x64, PCI/AGP, VGA/DVI, USB2, and whatever technology inevitably beats Thunderbolt), in the process screwing over everyone gullible enough to buy into their competing, incompatible solution.


I don't know what your computer industry background is or how deep your computer history go, but I do know that there are some errors here with these 2 comments.

1). I'm not sure about the others, but Apple didn't invent Nubus or PPC. Look towards MIT for NuBus. Look towards IBM for PPC (yeh, those guys who invented the standard PC). Apple simply created products that use those technologies.

2) These old technologies were created when there really weren't any clear winning standards. Everything was new, nothing was firmly established yet. No one truly could've predicted which technologies would become standard. Also, many of the technologies that became standard didn't do so because they were better, there're always other factors involved.

3). Your post implies that you are comparing like items that were all available at the same time, however, this is not the case. Neither x86/x64, PCI/AGP, VGA/DVI, or USB2 were available when Apple first started using PPC, NuBus, ADC, or Firewire (respectively). Apple eventually implemented the former technologies after they had been created & vetted by the industry.

Check first, before posting.

Reply Parent Score: 1