Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 1st Jul 2011 22:59 UTC
Internet & Networking Via TorrentFreak: "Entertainment industry lobby groups often describe file-sharers as thieves who refuse to pay for any type of digital content. But not everyone agrees with this view. Swedish telecom giant Ericsson sees copyright abuse as the underlying cause of the piracy problem. In a brilliant article, Rene Summer, Director of Government and Industry Relations at Ericsson, explains how copyright holders themselves actually breed pirates by clinging to outdated business methods." No faeces, Sherlock.
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RE: Competing with piracy
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Sat 2nd Jul 2011 02:01 UTC in reply to "Competing with piracy"
Bill Shooter of Bul
Member since:
2006-07-14

When somebody invents a 3D printer and you can reproduce a car for $0, that's going to turn this entire economy on its ass.


Judging by the cost of inkjet cartridges, I'm not so sure they anyone has to worry about that. Their are fixed energy and material costs for a car, you'd only be cutting out labor, distribution,marketing, and design costs.

But other items with lower material costs and higher profit margins will be susceptible to a similar effect with 3d printers.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Competing with piracy
by WorknMan on Sat 2nd Jul 2011 13:55 in reply to "RE: Competing with piracy"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

Their are fixed energy and material costs for a car, you'd only be cutting out labor, distribution,marketing, and design costs.


Well, not really in this scenario. If you needed more gas or a spare part for your car, you could simply 'print' whatever you need, or just make a brand new copy of the car every time you needed more gas ;) (I'd assume there'd be a way to 'delete' objects, as well as print them.)

Reply Parent Score: 2

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

I'm not sure you understood.

A brand new car may cost $20,000 USD, the raw cost of materials may still be $10,000 USD. $10,000 > $0. It would reduce costs, but not eliminate them.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Competing with piracy
by _txf_ on Sat 2nd Jul 2011 18:25 in reply to "RE[2]: Competing with piracy"
_txf_ Member since:
2008-03-17

Well, not really in this scenario. If you needed more gas or a spare part for your car, you could simply 'print' whatever you need, or just make a brand new copy of the car every time you needed more gas ;) (I'd assume there'd be a way to 'delete' objects, as well as print them.)


By the time that is possible we'll all

a) be underwater
b) cars won't need petrol (gas) to run
C) both a) and b) (everybody drives electric boats).

Edited 2011-07-02 18:27 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Competing with piracy
by Alfman on Sun 3rd Jul 2011 01:56 in reply to "RE[2]: Competing with piracy"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

"Well, not really in this scenario. If you needed more gas or a spare part for your car, you could simply 'print' whatever you need, or just make a brand new copy of the car every time you needed more gas"


I really don't understand the message that this analogy is intended to convey.


However you may be interested in the reprap project:
http://reprap.org/wiki/Main_Page

I saw one at maker fair. It would be awesome if these got more sophisticated and we could all own one.

Even with this type of home automation though, a manufacturer may be able to produce 1000 units in a single mold for the same energy costs it takes you to extrude 1 unit.

Reply Parent Score: 2