Linked by David Adams on Tue 12th Jul 2011 17:42 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless A recent Retrevo Gadgetology survey suggests that users are unclear on what exactly 4G means, don't know whether their current mobile service is 4G or not, and even if they do know, are unsure of the benefit. It also seems that mobile device owners' loyalty to their chosen platform is more important to them than higher network speeds.
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Comment by A.H.
by A.H. on Tue 12th Jul 2011 19:17 UTC
A.H.
Member since:
2005-11-11

"34% of iPhone owners mistakenly think they already have 4G"

What a surprise.

Reply Score: 10

RE: Comment by A.H.
by WorknMan on Tue 12th Jul 2011 19:41 in reply to "Comment by A.H."
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

"34% of iPhone owners mistakenly think they already have 4G"

What a surprise.


Well, I'm an Android user, with a rooted phone and a custom ROM installed, and even I'm not sure what 4g REALLY is. All I know is that if a carrier advertises 4g, it's probably going to be faster than 3g, and will most likely drain the battery like a motherf**ker.

Basically, if it says 4g, that means faster than 3g. For non-geeks, is there really any reason to give a shit about the specifics? I'll probably look and see what the average data speeds are in my area for each carrier, but other than that, I don't give a ding dong didley about acronyms.

People that argue about the technical definition of 4g are probably the ones that get their panties in a wad when you don't put 'GNU/' in front of Linux. Honestly, some people need to just go outside ....

Edited 2011-07-12 19:43 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by A.H.
by Neolander on Tue 12th Jul 2011 19:45 in reply to "RE: Comment by A.H."
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Well, if 4G provided some functional advantages over 3G to the user (like 3G does over 2G, by allowing the internet connection to run in parallel with standard voice/text services), the name would make sense. Otherwise, I agree that it's a bit of 3G++ : the protocol/pipe changes again, so what ?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by A.H.
by phoenix on Tue 12th Jul 2011 21:33 in reply to "RE: Comment by A.H."
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

A couple of months ago, HSPA (High-Speed Packet Access) which includes HSDPA and HSUPA (Download / Upload) was advertised by everyone as 3G. Which is correct.

Now, every wireless carrier that supports HSPA is advertising it as 4G. At least up here in Canada; should be the same down South. Which is false advertising.

And, all those carriers that support LTE or WiMAX are also advertising those as 4G. Which is just confusing everyone.

What's worse is that Rogers came out publically at the beginning of the year stating they would not call their HSPA network 4G, reserving that for their LTE rollout this summer. Thus, differentiating themselves from Telus and Bell that relabelled their HSPA networks as 4G.

Then, last month, they declared their HSPA network would henceforth be labelled 4G.

Last year, when I bought the LG Eve for my wife, it was a 3G phone, supporting 7 Mbps HSDPA. Last month, it was "upgraded" to 4G with a simple announcement on the Rogers Redboard site.

Is it really any surprise that people don't know whether they have a 4G-capable phone or not, when everyone's 3G (HSPA) phone has magically been "upgraded" to 4G? And everyone's new 4G (LTE) phone has been magically "downgraded" to 4G?

Reply Parent Score: 3

Excellent response!
by wocowboy on Wed 13th Jul 2011 09:11 in reply to "RE: Comment by A.H."
wocowboy Member since:
2006-06-01

That was just about the best comment I have seen on this site in AGES! You are exactly right. I might add the various little groups that find aspects of software programs that are not "free and open source" enough to suit them, as has been debated ad nauseum on here over the years.

As regards EDGE/3G/4G/LTE, there isn't enough of whatever technology they are trying to pass off as "4G/LTE/HSUPA+ whatever" right now to make any difference to any customer. It's only available in a few very tiny areas of the U.S. in major metropolitan areas, surrounded then by 3G in the suburbs and towns over 75,000 population, leaving the vast rest of the country served by EDGE coverage if that area has coverage at all. The cellphone companies have never completed installation of ANY "G" system before moving on to the next big thing, and it does not look like this will be any different. You have to drill way down deep in any carrier's coverage maps to even find their 4G coverage.

You can't even see the 4G coverage until you drill down deep in any carrier's coverage maps, so I say again, it really DOES NOT matter right not.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Comment by A.H.
by ichi on Wed 13th Jul 2011 10:13 in reply to "Comment by A.H."
ichi Member since:
2007-03-06

"34% of iPhone owners mistakenly think they already have 4G"

What a surprise.


Certainly not surprising although not because of a cheap shot at Apple customers' knowledge (does the average person know what the hell is 2/3/4G anyway?) but because of Apple's branding.

If you buy an "iPhone 3G" which happens to have 3G, it's not unreasonable (for the average user who doesn't know or even care about what 3G actually is) to expect the "iPhone 4" to be 4G.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by A.H.
by zima on Wed 13th Jul 2011 15:30 in reply to "RE: Comment by A.H."
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

I wonder what are the perceptions in Eastern Asia... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetraphobia

"iPhone Death"?

Edited 2011-07-13 15:31 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Comment by A.H.
by graig on Fri 15th Jul 2011 04:12 in reply to "Comment by A.H."
graig Member since:
2010-09-18

"34% of iPhone owners mistakenly think they already have 4G"

What a surprise.


really? i mean, come on people it says 3g right at the top of the iphone when it's in 3g mode.

Reply Parent Score: 1