Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 12th Jul 2011 20:47 UTC
Legal Tell 'm like it is, HTC. "HTC is disappointed at Apple's constant attempts at litigations instead of competing fairly in the market," said HTC general counsel Grace Lei in a statement, "HTC strongly denies all infringement claims raised by Apple in the past and present and reiterates our determination and commitment to protect our intellectual property rights."
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Comment by Jennimc
by Jennimc on Wed 13th Jul 2011 00:04 UTC
Jennimc
Member since:
2011-06-22

Thom is right about one thing. In other parts of the world... the far east is the best example of this, the concept of copyright isn’t really taken seriously. If HTC solely made products for use in their home country, that would be one thing, but making copies of Apple products to sell in Apple’s principle markets is an entirely different matter and will inevitably force Apple to defend it’s intellectual property.

If Apple didn’t defend it’s copyright, it would lose the protection that it offers. HTC’s lawyers are acting out of desperation, because they know they will lose.

This is a big part of the problem with people who call for the demise of the patent system. Notice you don’t get innovations coming from China, South Korea, etc. You get copies. So few companies invent anything unique in these regions simply because it is easier and cheaper and faster to copy what someone else invents.

That’s precisely WHY we in the U.S. have a patent/trademark/copyright system, flawed as it is companies like Apple, Nortel, IBM, Microsoft, Motorola, etc. can invest millions in R&D and know that, if they produce something unique, they get to keep control of it and profit from the effort.

That’s just not the case in most other parts of the world (especially Asian countries where copying is especially prevalent), and it’s why so few original products come from that region.

Edited 2011-07-13 00:07 UTC

Reply Score: -1

RE: Comment by Jennimc
by danger_nakamura on Wed 13th Jul 2011 01:39 in reply to "Comment by Jennimc"
danger_nakamura Member since:
2011-06-21

Notice you don’t get innovations coming from China, South Korea, etc.


That's a bold and fairly rascist, xenophobic assertion. Care to back it up or do you just want to leave it hanging out there?

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Comment by Jennimc
by bnolsen on Wed 13th Jul 2011 04:12 in reply to "RE: Comment by Jennimc"
bnolsen Member since:
2006-01-06

Sadly the mode of operation in China at least is to look at US patents as a source of what to blatantly copy, not what to respect.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by Jennimc
by unclefester on Wed 13th Jul 2011 11:16 in reply to "Comment by Jennimc"
unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

Try and learn some history before making such stupid and racist comments.

The Western industrial world was created by copying or rediscovering many Chinese/Korean/Japanese inventions including:
- paper
- silk
- porcelain
- banknotes
- moveable type printing
- gunpowder
- cannons
- rockets
- kites
- percussion drilling
- lacquering
- multi-compartment "unsinkable" ships

In fact one of the very few things the Chinese didn't invent before the West was glass.

China is very quickly reverting to it's natural place as the most technologically advanced society on Earth. It held this role for 2500 years until the early 1800s.

The President of Yale has said that Chinese universities will probably match or surpass the best western universities within 25 years.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationnews/7140330/Oxbridge...

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Comment by Jennimc
by static666 on Fri 15th Jul 2011 21:30 in reply to "RE: Comment by Jennimc"
static666 Member since:
2006-06-09

Try and learn some history before making such stupid and racist comments.

The Western industrial world was created by copying or rediscovering many Chinese/Korean/Japanese inventions including:


I would rather consider your argument as stupid and racist too.

The fact that a civilization managed to come with a particular idea of some device slightly faster than the other one is pretty much irrelevant and serves for historic purposes only. Also, we should give credit to the inventor, not the nation, as it was the human mind and creativity that made it happen and we all equally possess one.

In fact one of the very few things the Chinese didn't invent before the West was glass.

China is very quickly reverting to it's natural place as the most technologically advanced society on Earth. It held this role for 2500 years until the early 1800s.


Well as you might know medieval times were pretty harsh for inventors in Europe. Inquisition and all that stuff. Definitely did not help to speed things up. But that's history, just like the demise of China later.

It is naive to try to claim a nation to be the greatest just like playing some kind of Civ computer game, where one can be #1 by the number of technologies researched but yet fail miserably and lose on the global scale.

So far the history of modern China rapid technological development to a pretty big extent consists of blatant copying, so I can't see how you can 'revert' to being the greatest by cloning as much as possible. Moving Western companies production to China leads to even more reverse-engineered replicas appearing, and so on.

The President of Yale has said that Chinese universities will probably match or surpass the best western universities within 25 years.


And yes, letting students from developing countries plug into the very research process as early and deep as possible, definitely does not help Western universities to compete. As in case with China and any other - it only helps Chinese ones, by giving them a jump start by copying what kind of research Western ones are doing. But in the end, when there will be nothing to copy any more, it will all end up on par and we'll see how it goes. In fact, the real competition will only start then.

But competition itself is good as far as it is helping innovation. National superiority is bullshit (though I know this is a part of Chinese national agenda), at least it is clear that developed countries are living by that, hoping that developing ones won't bite the hand that was/and is still feeding them in some sense.

Reply Parent Score: 1