Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 18th Jul 2011 21:38 UTC
Google So, Google has come under scrutiny by the US Federal Trade Commission for possible anti-competitive practices. While I would say the FTC has far larger threats to competition to worry about (the inevitable p-word), it would appear there's sufficient suspicion to take a gander at Google's business practices.
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sonnyrao
Member since:
2011-07-18

"consumers chose... so I fail to see the problem.


No, just as Microsoft got OEMs to offer its operating system and browser, so, too, has Google leveraged its way to being default search engine on most PCs. This wasn't illegal or immoral. It was good business. But we're now at a point where Google wants to push its way into countless other markets -- using its strength in search.
"

Can you give an example of this? MS, basically forced OEMs to bundle Windows on PCs and we still hear about that today (the "Windows Tax") is there sometime similar that Google has done?

"besides that... it is not like Google is preventing other search companies from indexing the web, or preventing those same companies from selling advertising space.


That's not true. Google has lots of exclusive arrangements with content owners which aren't available to other search providers.
"

Hmm, Google failed to secure exclusive arrangements on
Music for their Music venture. What exclusive content have they secured?

Reply Parent Score: 2

Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

sonnyrao,

"Hmm, Google failed to secure exclusive arrangements on
Music for their Music venture. What exclusive content have they secured?"

Of course not, but then they are not a monopoly in the online music market. If I were to guess what the poster meant, it is that google is collecting a lot of information about users behind the scenes which competitors don't have access to. Between the old doubleclick network, adsense, analytics, gmail, maps, etc. Google has a great deal of information about us and it is no secret that it uses the information to create profiles to target ads.

Competitors such as fallen yahoo and bing also have the same breadth of services, however because they are so much smaller in terms of internet market share, they are less effective.

In other words, as with any other monopolies, the large market share in and of itself makes for an unfair competitive advantage. Not that I know the extend of the advantage or how to rectify it.

It concerns me a great deal that the most direct beneficiary of anti-trust proceedings against google would be microsoft.

On a holistic level (and off topic), I'm disenchanted that every single market is slowly being taken over by oligopolies who control just about everything. I call it the consolidation war.

Reply Parent Score: 2

modmans2ndcoming Member since:
2005-11-09

It is Google's information!!! why should Google's competitors have any freaking rights to the work products of Google?

You people have no clue what being an abusive monopoly is about. You are making me sound like a free market nut job, but seriously...If I build a company that sells marketing based on metrics I gather from users of my software systems that I provide, no one has any rights to that information but me. I don't care if I have 99% market share.

Reply Parent Score: 2

tomcat Member since:
2006-01-06

Can you give an example of this? MS, basically forced OEMs to bundle Windows on PCs and we still hear about that today (the "Windows Tax") is there sometime similar that Google has done?


Google pays OEMs to put its crapware on your machine before you buy it, in order to make google.com the default search provider.

Hmm, Google failed to secure exclusive arrangements on Music for their Music venture. What exclusive content have they secured?


Here's just one small example.
http://investor.google.com/releases/2006/0807.html

Google doesn't announce most of its exclusive agreements. It gets content providers (newspapers, magazines, etc) to give it exclusive access to index their walled gardens.

Reply Parent Score: 2