Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 21st Jul 2011 14:10 UTC, submitted by Jennimc
Mozilla & Gecko clones "Over the last couple of weeks, Mozilla has finally stepped up its 64-bit testing process. There are now five slaves dedicated to building Firefox for Windows x64, which means that from Firefox 8 and onwards, you'll be able to pick up 64-bit builds that are functionally identical to its 32-bit cousins but operating in native 64-bit CPU and memory space." Th 64bit version is about 10% faster, benchmarks show.
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Old news
by diegocg on Thu 21st Jul 2011 15:42 UTC
diegocg
Member since:
2005-07-08

I have been using 64-bit firefox for years...in Linux. And 64 bit distros for even longer. This only news in the Windows world.

Reply Score: 11

RE: Old news
by BluenoseJake on Thu 21st Jul 2011 21:25 in reply to "Old news"
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

funny, It's only the last couple of years that we needed a 64Bit OS for desktops, but if you think that running 64Bit linux for years is some big deal, then please continue mouthing off. I (and most people) switched to a 64Bit OS when I had 4G or more, no reason to before. I got my first 4G computer in 2006, and I installed both Linux 64 and Windows 64. Running 64Bit Linux before that was just useless, really

It's not some sort of limitation of Windows that has kept Firefox 32Bit on Windows, either, It was Mozilla. IE has a 64Bit version, So it can be done. Mozilla just didn't (or couldn't) do it, I don't know why, and I don't care, 32Bit firefox runs just fine.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Old news
by Valhalla on Fri 22nd Jul 2011 06:58 in reply to "RE: Old news"
Valhalla Member since:
2006-01-24

I (and most people) switched to a 64Bit OS when I had 4G or more, no reason to before.

While more addressable RAM is certainly a factor, you can't discard the additional registers which certainly makes quite a difference in intense computation.

The x86 is a very register-starved cpu, with only 6 (eax, ebx, ecx, edx, esi, edi) really being general purpose, 64bit adds another 8 registers which can really help alot in heavy computing since registers are by far the fastest place in a cpu to store/retrieve data and being able to store in a register rather than pushing onto stack can have great impact in loop performance. Also being able to manipulate 64bits rather than 32bits per instruction obviously also is a benefit beyond that of addressable space.

Downside is larger code size due to address references being 64bit, but I'd say the benefits far outweigh that unless you are very starved for RAM.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Old news
by Lennie on Fri 22nd Jul 2011 11:13 in reply to "RE: Old news"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

I don't know, I had a DEC Alpha way before that time it ran 64-bit Linux just fine. It didn't have as much legacy stuff to drag around so they had done a lot fo things right. RISC, many registers, I think one memory region instead of some odd limitations that are in x86/amd64.

Maybe 64-bit wasn't useful for my machine, but some people already had 4GB of memory at that time.

I know you could also install Windows on it, but as I understand it there where pretty much no applications available.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Old news
by Surtur on Fri 22nd Jul 2011 11:28 in reply to "RE: Old news"
Surtur Member since:
2009-04-15

[...] I (and most people) switched to a 64Bit OS when I had 4G or more, no reason to before. I got my first 4G computer in 2006, and I installed both Linux 64 and Windows 64. Running 64Bit Linux before that was just useless, really


While this may be true for many users like you I personally consider (being an OpenBSD user) native NX-bit support without hacks quite a feature. This has been discussed at http://www.openbsd.org/papers/auug04/mgp00001.html whereas the following page gives a nice overview over the problems regarding i386 http://www.openbsd.org/papers/auug04/mgp00017.html

Quoting the Wikpedia Article summarizing the NX-bit (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NX_bit) it seems this is the same with many Linux distributions:

Some desktop Linux distributions such as Fedora Core 6, Ubuntu and openSUSE do not enable the HIGHMEM64 option by default, which is required to gain access to the NX bit in 32-bit mode, in their default kernel; this is because the PAE mode that is required to use the NX bit causes pre-Pentium Pro (including Pentium MMX) and Celeron M and Pentium M processors without NX support to fail to boot.


Ymmv of course as many people do not care. Although OpenBSD does not even support more than 4GB of memory (even on amd64) by default in a release atm (coming in November), given that there are no downsides, why should I settle for less...

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Old news
by andih on Thu 21st Jul 2011 22:36 in reply to "Old news"
andih Member since:
2010-03-27

lol yeah agree ;)

I really don’t get what people see in windows anyway.. Windows is for noobs, really! Its designed for people needing only very basic functionality. Allright, you might get some advanced things done by:
¤Searching for useful apps on piratebay or something (and maybe catching a rootkit in the attempt). But its slow, risky, and the chances that you have to commit piracy to make stubborn windoze do what you like, is big.
¤Paying extra to MS or some 3rd party for using their solutions

In linux, a world of possibilities is just an aptitude (portage or whatever) and a .conf away! Fast, powerful, easy, and secure.. and even free! People that are still using windows must have very basic and standard needs or simply doesn’t know any better.

After I switched to linux I never download pirated SW. No need for that using linux. Piracy is a windows thing. Funny then that the companies that by all means want to stop SW piracy are the same that also probably would like to see linux and OSS dead. (Although they might not want to admit it)

Well, its about time that windows tries to catch up using 64bit. I lol when browsing VLSC and users are encouraged strongly to go for the 32bits version of MS office 2010 even on new 64 bits win7. wow,, Its 2011 and 64bit isn't exactly new.. well for other OSes at least. :p

Windows is strangly enough still popular and used all over.. but "popular" != "good",, Dvorak and Querty is a good example for that. Or Bush and Ron Paul :p
Even though i loathe windows, I guess it still has its uses.. for somebody at least, or that it seems.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Old news
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Thu 21st Jul 2011 22:59 in reply to "RE: Old news"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Please, no more references to R*n P**l. I'd like one site where I can pretend intelligent people don't agree with him.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Old news
by Spiron on Fri 22nd Jul 2011 01:39 in reply to "RE: Old news"
Spiron Member since:
2011-03-08

You're either an idiot or a troll, cause last time i checked a hell of a lot of the market leaders in software, thinking Photoshop and Maya, run on windows and not natively on linux. As to your comments about piracy, most users don't commit it, and don't need to. If you really need to then its a relatively fast process thanks to BitTorrent. And just so you know most people can make windows do what i want without EVER having to go to ThePirateBay. there are programs out there that aren't open-source but are free that give you easy access to advanced usage of Windows.

And unless you've really been living under a rock for the last 5 years you would know that Windows supports 64bit, and its rather good actually. Microsoft cannot be held responsible for the mozilla foundation not wanting to port firefox to 64bit windows. IE has been 64 bit since Win7, so essentially 2008 if you include prebuilds and beta's.

There are many reason why Windows is still popular, the main one being that people are used to it. They have used it at home for the last 15 years and in buisnesses for around the same time and people like what is familiar. There are other reasons, like the stigma's attached to linux and other alternate OS's, for example Linux still being viewed as the 'nerds' os and thus people either thinking they are not smart enough for it OR them holding nerds in contempt. Another example is that there are stigma's against free-stuff and quality, but that is a seperate disscussion. And you comment about keyboard layouts is irrelevant. No-one uses Dvorak because it never caught on. Neither is superior than the other. It's purely a matter of preferance.

And before you start campaigning against me as an open-source banger who is also a Microsoft fanboi, I just want you to know that i used ArchLinux and Gentoo as my main OS's, so i see more terminal and config-file work than you on your debian-based system do.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Old news
by BluenoseJake on Fri 22nd Jul 2011 12:42 in reply to "RE: Old news"
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

I've never had to use piracy to make Windows do what I like, between OSS software and MS's own software available for free (Express editions of VS and SQL Server, for example) , but hey, if you need to find a rationalization for your piracy, it's cool, perhaps you just didn't know better.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Old news
by BallmerKnowsBest on Mon 25th Jul 2011 11:52 in reply to "RE: Old news"
BallmerKnowsBest Member since:
2008-06-02

lol yeah agree ;)

I really don’t get what people see in windows anyway.. Windows is for noobs, really!


As opposed to Linux, which is apparently for semi-literate teenagers who believe that "lol" is punctuation.

Reply Parent Score: 2