Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 22nd Jul 2011 08:36 UTC, submitted by diegocg
Linux Linux 3.0 has been released. Technically, the release of version 3.0 of the Linux kernel shouldn't be too eventful, since the jump in version number doesn't actually signify any huge change or whatever; the only reason behind the bump to 3.0 is to come to saner version numbering. Still, man, it's like, totally version 3 of the Linux kernel.
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Btrfs
by panzi on Fri 22nd Jul 2011 12:51 UTC
panzi
Member since:
2006-01-22

The big question for me is: Does Btrfs finally have a fsck that can fix errors? If there isn't such a tool/feature I don't use the filesystem.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Btrfs
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Fri 22nd Jul 2011 20:44 in reply to "Btrfs"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

It doesn't. Its still understood to not be ready for prime time. The online fsck is probably big enough news that you'll hear about it. No idea when it will happen.There was an effort that looked promising at the beginning of the year, but they scrapped it for whatever design/performance reason. I'm guessing its not trivial.

But, I completely agree. I'm not playing with it until it has online fsck error fixing.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Btrfs
by Lennie on Sat 23rd Jul 2011 16:27 in reply to "RE: Btrfs"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

The last news I've seen yesterday* is that they have one, but they are doing extensive testing.

But btrfs will probably have 3 things:
- the one that was added in the Linux 3.0: scrubbing: it will check the checksums and data on the disk and try to fix any problems it can find. This is something which can run will the filesystem is in use I guess.

- seems someone posted a patch on the btrfs mailinglist recently to do online filesystem checks in the kernel. To check if the meta-data is still consistent.

- and the offline fsck already mentioned above.

* I can't seem to find it anymore though

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Btrfs
by Elv13 on Fri 22nd Jul 2011 21:06 in reply to "Btrfs"
Elv13 Member since:
2006-06-12

BTRFS is a COW File System. If it get in invalid state, it should be able to reverse itself and by itself to any previous valid state for the affected files.

If it work, I can't tell, it worked fine until now (I run integrity check against saved md5 checksum and file counter for unused directories). In theory, this kind of file system is much more resistant than classic file system like Ext or Apple HFS+.

Offline check can be nice, but they should be useless no mather how they work. It's the job for the online integrity checked.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Btrfs
by vivainio on Fri 22nd Jul 2011 21:22 in reply to "RE: Btrfs"
vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26

BTRFS is a COW File System. If it get in invalid state, it should be able to reverse itself and by itself to any previous valid state for the affected files.

If it work, I can't tell, it worked fine until now (I run integrity check against saved md5 checksum and file counter for unused directories).


It doesn't work.

My entire btrfs filesystem got corrupted the other day because of battery running out. Without fsck, there was no way to make it work again.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Btrfs
by Delgarde on Sun 24th Jul 2011 21:55 in reply to "RE: Btrfs"
Delgarde Member since:
2008-08-19

BTRFS is a COW File System. If it get in invalid state, it should be able to reverse itself and by itself to any previous valid state for the affected files.


Not quite. It supports COW snapshots, so you should (in theory) be able to fall back to a previous snapshot. But that doesn't help much if you're not using snapshots, and don't have anything to fall back to.

Reply Parent Score: 2