Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 22nd Jul 2011 21:03 UTC, submitted by fran
Linux "Lightweight Portable Security (LPS), created by USA's Department of Defense, is a small Linux live CD focusing on privacy and security, for this reason, it boots from a CD and executes from RAM, providing a web browser, a file manager and some interesing tools. LPS-Public turns an untrusted system into a trusted network client." Complete with backdoor so they can spy on all of us I'm sure!1!!
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D'oh!
by marcp on Sat 23rd Jul 2011 09:50 UTC
marcp
Member since:
2007-11-23

Wow, "encryption tool" screenshot is the most funniest and hilarious thing I've seen by far in this US DoD context, really.
USA would *never* allow their services or citizens to encrypt files with unbreakable algorithm. Instead, they provide them with tool that they can control, with the cipher they can decrypt ... what a coincident!
Also, IIRC, USA has some serious "export of cryptography" issuess, which also proves it right, eh?

http://www.bis.doc.gov/encryption/

USA as a whole has a very unique ability to make me laugh almost everytime I read about it or hear some rediculous news regarding USA.

Reply Score: 2

RE: D'oh!
by Alfman on Sat 23rd Jul 2011 17:12 in reply to "D'oh!"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

marcp,

"Also, IIRC, USA has some serious 'export of cryptography' issuess, which also proves it right, eh?"


This indeed was a serious problem with US government controlling encryption. It was covered under munitions laws. It resulted in the exact opposite of the intended effect. Developers were forced to do all cryptographic research and publications outside of the US.

This was obviously a stupid policy on multiple levels, but it was no doubt the result of having stupid politicians making choices without first consorting with more knowledgeable subject mater experts.

However the government has gotten the sense to relax most encryption restrictions.

(From the top of your link)

"On June 25, 2010, the Bureau of Industry and Security published amendments to the encryption provisions of the Export Administration Regulations (EAR). These amendments remove many items from control as encryption items. They also reduce or eliminate review and reporting requirements for many more items that remain controlled as encryption items."

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: D'oh!
by CodeMonkey on Sun 24th Jul 2011 15:29 in reply to "D'oh!"
CodeMonkey Member since:
2005-09-22

Wow, "encryption tool" screenshot is the most funniest and hilarious thing I've seen by far in this US DoD context, really. USA would *never* allow their services or citizens to encrypt files with unbreakable algorithm. Instead, they provide them with tool that they can control, with the cipher they can decrypt ... what a coincident!


The encryption tool is actually called eWizard. The free version uses 128-bit AES which is "technically" breakable but still computationally infeasible. In addition to just a passphrase or keyfile, it can also use the certificates and keys stored in a user's smart-card for the encryption keys.

Reply Parent Score: 2