Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 4th Aug 2011 21:38 UTC
Talk, Rumors, X Versus Y The Google-Microsoft patent war of words is continuing. Yesterday, Google (rightfully so, in my book) accused Apple, Microsoft, and Oracle partaking in an organised patent attack against Android, instead of competing on merit, claiming that they bought up Novell's and Nortel's patents solely to attack Android and its device makers. Microsoft struck back, claiming Google was offered to join in on the bids for the Novell patents, but rejected the offer. Google has now responded to this accusation - and to make matters even more confusing, Microsoft responded back. A public shouting match between two powerful parties? Count me in!
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andydread
Member since:
2009-02-02

.. cheering for Stalin over Hitler - neither option is very appealing.

Microsoft / Apple / et. al are using the (broken) patent system to their advantage and presumably avoiding supporting any changes that would take patent power away from big companies.

On the other hand, Google is 'anti-patent' mostly because they want to feel free to copy whatever they feel like and use it to create a larger ad channel for their real profit engine - so copying something and then giving it out for free is much more appealing than if they have to license parts of it. And to help that engine along, they collect all data possible about those users while pushing a never-ending supply of ads. Oh yea! Go Google! (???)

Patents are supposed to protect innovation and give a window where competitors either can't use a new idea or have to license it, so there's certainly validity to Apple going after Google given that they've been granted patents on various touch / portable device technologies. On the other hand, allowing 17-20 year patents on what are often trivial inventions as part of a extremely expensive and litigious system isn't a good thing at all.


The problem is software patents. Not patents in general. Patenting commodity software such as operating systems is a folly and must stop. Microsoft and Apple are pushing for a day when no one can write open source software without treading on their trivial software patents which are not novel or non-obvious. Your attempt to astroturf for Apple by shifting the conversation has failed. Its about software patents.

BTW a court has found that Apple has copied Nokia's technology. The ITC has found that Apple has copied technology that now belongs to HTC. FYI

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