Linked by snydeq on Mon 8th Aug 2011 22:14 UTC
Google InfoWorld's Neil McAllister questions whether slowing product development, legal woes, and rising bureaucracy will signal trying times ahead for Google. "With Google's rapid growth have come new challenges. It faces intense competition in all of its major markets, even as it enters new ones. Its newer initiatives have often struggled to reach profitability. It must answer multiple ongoing legal challenges, to say nothing of antitrust probes in the United States and Europe. Privacy advocates accuse it of running roughshod over individual rights. As a result, it's becoming more cautious and risk-averse. But worst of all, as it grows ever larger and more cumbersome, it may be losing its appeal to the highly educated, impassioned workers that power its internal knowledge economy." Note from Thom: Are Apple's Microsoft's Google's days behind it? I don't think you can call yourself a technology giant without a '[...] is dying'-article.
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Tony Swash
Member since:
2009-08-22

- Google has never sued anyone with patent and/or trademark infringement, has never threatened anyone to do so, and has never shown any intention to do so, let alone to squash competition.


If Google had no intention to ever sue anyone why did they bid for the Nortel Patents. Merely owning the patents would active nothing. If Google intended to acquire the patents for defensive purposes (which is what they said) how could patents be used defensively without suing or threatening to sue anyone?

- Apple is suing countless companies over patent and trademark infringement, has threatened to do so countless times, all to squash competition, in a coordinated efforts with the other companies in the anti-Google cartel.

Those are the facts. You can come up with " what-ifs" all you want - but when it comes to Apple, we don't have to resort to "what-ifs", and that's what bothers most of us.


Let's stick to the facts you say and then prattle on about an imaginary 'anti-Google cartel'. What is the evidence for this cartel, what product is such a cartel protecting? This is just Google PR ingested by gullible people hypnotised by Google's distribution of a few free baubles and regurgitated whole. Please.

Apple isn't suing Google because Google was careful not to infringe Apple patents in it's own branded handsets. Some Android phone makers have copied design elements that are specifically and clearly covered by Apple patents and Apple are suing. Good. Intellectual theft is just that - theft.

Microsoft's core business is under attack by Google in a different arena and has decided to counterattack through its patent portfolio. I don't care who wins that one but what did Google expect.? Did Google think it could use it's huge monopoly income to deliberately attack other large companies core businesses through giving away free stuff and not expect a fight? What planet do they live on? This is a grown up world and all Google can do is whine and complain when companies they attack don't roll over and die but actually counterattack.

Reflecting Google's core company cultural belief that all the worlds knowledge belongs to them and can be rendered worthless to everyone else except Google they decided quite deliberately (and the evidence is in the public domain even if Google want to use a legal technicality to get it neutered) to not bother getting a Java licence. Arrogant idiots. They will will probably lose to Oracle. Good. Intellectual theft is just that - theft.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

If Google had no intention to ever sue anyone why did they bid for the Nortel Patents. Merely owning the patents would active nothing. If Google intended to acquire the patents for defensive purposes (which is what they said) how could patents be used defensively without suing or threatening to sue anyone?


Oh come one, don't make it seem as if using force defensively is the same as using it offensively. That's utterly idiotic, and you know it. I have no issues with a company using patents defensively, much in the same way I don't have any issues with, say, shop owners in London using violence to protect their shops from being looted.

Let's stick to the facts you say and then prattle on about an imaginary 'anti-Google cartel'. What is the evidence for this cartel, what product is such a cartel protecting?


Look at the consortia buying the Novell and Nortel patents. Look at the curious simultaneous lawsuits. Look at the fact that these companies make up the old boys network using legal means to keep out newcomers. Look at the close friendship between Ellison and Jobs. Denying there's a concerted effort going on to attack Android at this point in time is laughable.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Tony Swash Member since:
2009-08-22

Look at the consortia buying the Novell and Nortel patents. Look at the curious simultaneous lawsuits. Look at the fact that these companies make up the old boys network using legal means to keep out newcomers. Look at the close friendship between Ellison and Jobs. Denying there's a concerted effort going on to attack Android at this point in time is laughable.


Speculative waffle. When you start talking about 'curious simultaneous lawsuits' but don't show the slightest shred of evidence to show collusion you reveal yourself wandering into fantasy land - Area 51 territory. Maybe the 'curious simultaneous lawsuits' is the result of simultaneous breaches of other people's patents based on a mad scramble by the handset makers to catch up to the iPhone after being caught completely flat footed.

And then to cap it all you mention the Nortel consortium as evidence of this shadowy cartel - a consortium into which Google were invited and which included Apple, RIM and Microsoft all whom are competing against each other. Google declined to join.

The only plot is the one Google lost when it so totally cocked that one up. And then whined about it. And then people you like you who should know better become trapped in some sort of Google PR imaginary land.

Sheesh.

Reply Parent Score: 1