Linked by David Adams on Wed 10th Aug 2011 17:12 UTC, submitted by R_T_F_M
Apple The lure of shiny toys has helped Apple's BSD-based Mac OS X operating system overtake Linux to become the operating system that is the second most used by developers, according to Evans Data.
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Mac OS at a low level
by 3rdalbum on Thu 11th Aug 2011 08:53 UTC
3rdalbum
Member since:
2008-05-26

Anyone here used Mac OS X at a fairly low level, for instance, recovering someone's computer from a command-line?

In low-level operation, it's no BSD. It doesn't behave or work like BSD.

In high-level operation with the GUI, of course it's nothing like BSD.

The kernel may be derived from BSD, but I'm pretty sure the kernel Apple ships with its computers is not the compiled version of the source code Apple distributes. Knowing Apple, it probably has very little BSD content still left in it.

Android uses the Linux kernel, but Android is not "the Linux platform". Because it doesn't work like a Linux distro. Well, OS X is not the BSD platform - it doesn't work like BSD and it's certainly not developed from BSD culture.

Reply Score: 6

RE: Mac OS at a low level
by ricegf on Thu 11th Aug 2011 10:03 in reply to "Mac OS at a low level"
ricegf Member since:
2007-04-25

Android uses the Linux kernel, but Android is not "the Linux platform".


I think you mean that Android is not "the Gnu platform".

Linux is just a kernel, nothing more, and Android as currently shipped most certainly uses it. But since the userland is Java rather than Gnu, Android apps run under Gnu only as in an emulator. Same kernel, but different apps.

Same with freeBSD et. al. and OS/X, practical app portability pretty much doesn't exist, even though they both use BSD-derived kernels. And if BSD fans want to claim OS/X as part of their family, even if you believe it's just a third cousin's brother-in-law twice removed, why argue with them?

So many people laughed at rms for wanting to distinguish Gnu/Linux from the kernel. Got to be annoying to find out he was right. Again. ;-)

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE: Mac OS at a low level
by demetrioussharpe on Sat 13th Aug 2011 05:43 in reply to "Mac OS at a low level"
demetrioussharpe Member since:
2009-01-09

Anyone here used Mac OS X at a fairly low level, for instance, recovering someone's computer from a command-line?

In low-level operation, it's no BSD. It doesn't behave or work like BSD.

In high-level operation with the GUI, of course it's nothing like BSD.

The kernel may be derived from BSD, but I'm pretty sure the kernel Apple ships with its computers is not the compiled version of the source code Apple distributes. Knowing Apple, it probably has very little BSD content still left in it.

Android uses the Linux kernel, but Android is not "the Linux platform". Because it doesn't work like a Linux distro. Well, OS X is not the BSD platform - it doesn't work like BSD and it's certainly not developed from BSD culture.


It doesn't matter how it "acts". The fact of the matter is that it's running BSD code under the covers. I'm not sure how long you've been in the *nix community, but you seem to be forgetting the rule of seperation: Separate policy from mechanism; separate interfaces from engines.

The mechanisms are the same, even if the policies are not.

Reply Parent Score: 1