Linked by David Adams on Fri 12th Aug 2011 03:50 UTC
Microsoft Microsoft no longer thinks Linux poses a threat to its desktop Windows business. Directions on Microsoft's Wes Miller pointed out via Twitter how Microsoft has changed the boilerplate "Competition" section in its last two annual financial filings with the SEC.
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RE[3]: Successful
by joekiser on Fri 12th Aug 2011 16:14 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Successful"
joekiser
Member since:
2005-06-30

The Gnome 3, Unity, KDE, OS X DM, Windows DM argument sounds like the same fucking argument over gay marriage in the US. Who cares?! If you aren't gay, why the fuck does it bother you? This is the exact same situation. Who cares if you don't like Gnome 3. .


Bad analogy, no one is forcing gay marriage on you. Plus, I can throw your own argument back at you by asking if you don't care, why even bother to comment on the article? My argument was that Windows has improved, while Gnome/KDE/Ubuntu regressed with their latest versions. These UIs are being forced onto people by planned obsolescence of the older interfaces (unless you use a LTS, in which case you risk not having support for new hardware). As someone who grew up with UNIX, I know I can switch to awesome or openCDE now that all the other desktop environments are broken. A typical user does not know that, nor do they care to learn, and that is why Linux has been downgraded as a threat on the desktop.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Successful
by senshikaze on Fri 12th Aug 2011 17:44 in reply to "RE[3]: Successful"
senshikaze Member since:
2011-03-08

If anyone truly thought Linux was a threat on a non-power user's desktop, I have a bridge to sell.
I use nothing but Linux, and while it would be nice to not have to fix a virus infested computer 1 to 2 times a year, I also don't want a "My [insert bullshit here] doesn't look 100% like it does on windows. Put it back." call every other week either. I don't use windows, but I don't push Linux either.

I wanted to comment because all you hear on websites are the people that hate Gnome 3, Unity, KDE 4. There are those of us who actually enjoy one of the above (or more than one), we just generally don't toss our preferences around like they are candy.

My analogy was pretty bad (my apologies), but it was the only thing I could think of that wasn't a car analogy.

Edited 2011-08-12 17:46 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Successful
by TechGeek on Fri 12th Aug 2011 19:46 in reply to "RE[4]: Successful"
TechGeek Member since:
2006-01-14

If anyone truly thought Linux was a threat on a non-power user's desktop, I have a bridge to sell.
I use nothing but Linux, and while it would be nice to not have to fix a virus infested computer 1 to 2 times a year, I also don't want a "My [insert bullshit here] doesn't look 100% like it does on windows. Put it back." call every other week either. I don't use windows, but I don't push Linux either.

I wanted to comment because all you hear on websites are the people that hate Gnome 3, Unity, KDE 4. There are those of us who actually enjoy one of the above (or more than one), we just generally don't toss our preferences around like they are candy.

My analogy was pretty bad (my apologies), but it was the only thing I could think of that wasn't a car analogy.


You know, I hear this argument all the time and I just have to laugh. Most people can't run Windows without it getting completely hosed. So aside from a diminishing number of software titles, why exactly do consumers need Windows? They would do equally well with a Linux box without the problem of the machine getting completely hosed.

I think Microsoft downgraded Linux as a threat not because Linux has gotten worse somehow, but because the desktop OS paradigm is shifting. More people are doing their work on their mobile devices. Largely that means iOS and Android. Hence, Apple and Google are now the threats.

Edited 2011-08-12 19:47 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2