Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 15th Aug 2011 12:04 UTC
Google Okay once again I'm breaking my own one-week time-off from OSNews due to, you know, taking a break and being too busy with other things, but this one is big - very big. Also, only the second time in OSNews history we've used the 'breaking'-tag. Google has just announced it is going to buy Motorola Mobility for $12.5 billion (more here). While providing Google with a dedicated mobile phone business, it also gives Google ownership of one of the most valuable mobile technology patent portfolios in existence. Update: Responses from the Android ecosystem are positive. HTC: "We welcome the news of today's acquisition, which demonstrates that Google is deeply committed to defending Android, its partners, and the entire ecosystem." Sony Ericsson & LG: "We welcome Google's commitment to defending Android and its partners."
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RE[2]: Awesome
by Not2Sure on Mon 15th Aug 2011 20:13 UTC in reply to "RE: Awesome"
Not2Sure
Member since:
2009-12-07

Bryce Elder of FT/alphaville reports: "I'd be more interested in Motorola Mobility's patent portfolio. It has 24,500 patents, including 15,200 for handsets and another 6,200 for cornerstone technologies such as 3G, 802.11 (ie. wifi) and MPEG-4 (ie. video)."

That should give some leverage in the future patent wars.


Seeing as how MS and APPL have already filed infringment claims against MMI, I seriously doubt they considered it a threat deterrent. I fail to see how Google owning the same weaker portfolio makes it any stronger overnight.

This whole announcement is alot of fanboi PR spin and hype.

1) Motorola is a hardware OEM whose market share has been on a steady dramatic decline and industry analysts were writing its epitaph just a few years ago. 1 or 2 profitable quarters does not erase a track record of diminished quality and problems that spans a decade.

2) Google, a software company with an extremely poor track record of managing consumer hardware experience (see Nexus One, lolz) is purchasing one to "bolt on" to its existing corporate structure. Yeah, that has a history of working well.

3) People who think the other Android licensees are happy about this really need to think 30 seconds. The "statements" from so-called competitors in support of this acquisition are so closely-worded it appears they all "voluntarily" put out a joint press release. That is fairly creepy and should raise eyebrows at the DOJ.

4) If you think Google is not going to favor its own hardware over that of licensees you're being naive. Android is now on the same path as Symbian.

On the plus side, Google is paying $12.5 billion for MMI, Microsoft paid $8.5 billion for Skype. Go figure.

Reply Parent Score: 1

glarepate Member since:
2006-01-04

3) People who think the other Android licensees are happy about this really need to think 30 seconds. The "statements" from so-called competitors in support of this acquisition are so closely-worded it appears they all "voluntarily" put out a joint press release. That is fairly creepy and should raise eyebrows at the DOJ.


I know. What I really expected them all to say was:

"We welcome our new googly overlords and look forward to surrendering beeeeelyuns in IP licensing fees in order to be allowed to continue to do business at all."

You don't think a better way to get the attention of of the regulations bodies would be to say that they feel threatened by this, or that it seems like too much concentration of power? You think that we will see headlines like:

DOJ investigates pod-person CEO statements

I remain unconvinced.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Awesome
by cdude on Tue 16th Aug 2011 02:41 in reply to "RE[2]: Awesome"
cdude Member since:
2008-09-21

I fail to see how Google owning the same weaker portfolio makes it any stronger overnight.


Such a fight is expensive, takes long and usually ends with an arrangement. Sometimes it's easier and more cheap to just pay (and maybe even get something in return) to reach that arrangement faster.

Now the interests are different. Moto's top-priority is protecting the Android-ecosystem now.

3) People who think the other Android licensees are happy about this really need to think 30 seconds.


You can be sure they get something in return. The statements are clear that this protects the ecosystem and the partners. Both of them where in strong need for that. And maybe there are even more details we don't know about yet.

4) If you think Google is not going to favor its own hardware over that of licensees you're being naive.


If you think google would kill it's successful Android online-/service-strategy then you are naive. They have better ways to maximize profit while still keeping partners happy (like removing the Microsoft/Apple taxes and control what they just did & kick competition out what is what happens with Microsoft/Nokia Phone 7).

Edited 2011-08-16 03:00 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2