Linked by David Adams on Wed 17th Aug 2011 17:46 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Ars Technica is reporting that US Retailer Best Buy has been able to sell less than 10% of the TouchPad tablets that it ordered from HP, and now wants HP to take them back. Similarly, deal-a-day site Woot offered TouchPads at a very aggressive price, and only managed to sell 612 of them. This is for a site that often sells out goofy tech widgets in hours. When the TouchPad was gearing up for release, there seemed to be a fair amount of interest among geeks. Is it just that it hasn't resonated the same way with the general public, or have people just been disappointed once they've put their hands on one?
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RE: HP Touchpad
by Sabon on Wed 17th Aug 2011 20:36 UTC
Sabon
Member since:
2005-07-06

I really wish the HP Touchpad was doing well. Just the idea of an OS not tied to MS or Google or Apple is a great thing.

The problem for HP, as well as Android and any other tablets, is that they can't do what Google did with Android phones and that is give them away.

Plus, when you ask 94% of people out there what tablet they want to buy they said, "iPad".

HP and the others have to figure out how to market their devices in such a way that actually intrigues users. So far they haven't figured it out.

Of course it would be great if companies would just stop looking to see what is successful out there and find a new category of something they would love to have for themselves. Something cool they thought of that is missing in their life.

Steve Jobs did that with the iPad. And no, it is not like previous tablets. It is the right size, the right amount of speed, the right amount of things it can do.

It was the right new device at the right time at the right price. It completely took the rest of the industry by surprise and they are still reeling, trying to figure out what to do to catch up.

As far as previous tablet pcs, like Microsoft's for instance. It was like taking a 16 oz hammer and trying to turn it into a pen by drilling a hole in the handle of the hammer and pushing the internals of a BIC pen inside. For 99% of people out there, MS tablets suck big time.

Reply Score: 5

RE[2]: HP Touchpad
by BallmerKnowsBest on Thu 18th Aug 2011 02:49 in reply to "RE: HP Touchpad"
BallmerKnowsBest Member since:
2008-06-02

Plus, when you ask 94% of people out there what tablet they want to buy they said, "iPad".


Allow me to respond to that by quoting the response of every Apple fanboy ever when confronted with the overwhelming dominance of Windows:

"Clearly that's just because they're too ignorant to realize that there are alternatives."

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: HP Touchpad
by Clinton on Mon 22nd Aug 2011 06:00 in reply to "RE[2]: HP Touchpad"
Clinton Member since:
2005-07-05

Allow me to respond to that by quoting the response of every Apple fanboy ever when confronted with the overwhelming dominance of Windows:

"Clearly that's just because they're too ignorant to realize that there are alternatives."


I don't know, in my case I do know there are alternatives, but I think the iPhone and iPad provide the most consistent and polished user experience (with the exception of turn-based GPS on my Droid--when it worked).

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: HP Touchpad
by Lennie on Thu 18th Aug 2011 07:38 in reply to "RE: HP Touchpad"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

I have a feeling that for HP it is important to sell to consumers because they need their software/hardware stack to be good.

But consumers is not their main focus, the business users are.

Apple is not used by businesses as much and the walled garden of the iPad, I think, might not be what businesses want.

HP wants one platform that works on PC, tablet, printer and mobile. Businesses might like that.

Reply Parent Score: 2