Linked by David Adams on Sat 20th Aug 2011 15:38 UTC, submitted by sjvn
Editorial In five years, Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst sees the traditional desktop becoming obsolete.
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RE: Business Computers
by shotsman on Sun 21st Aug 2011 05:57 UTC in reply to "Business Computers"
shotsman
Member since:
2005-07-22

The RH guy was talking about the future.

So suffix many of your points with the word 'yet' and suddenly what he is saying makes a lot of sense.

Sure there will be people who need a traditional desktop (me included) but personally I think that the majority of bog standard users will be able to do everything they need without using a traditional desktop.

AFAIK, Windows 8(Metro) is going to dumb down the desktop even further and make it look like a giant WP7. If you can use that then you have to ask yourself, do you need a traditional desktop.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Business Computers
by jbauer on Sun 21st Aug 2011 08:25 in reply to "RE: Business Computers"
jbauer Member since:
2005-07-06

The RH guy was talking about the future.

So suffix many of your points with the word 'yet' and suddenly what he is saying makes a lot of sense.


That prediction was already made for netbooks.

Of course, that was a cool thing to say when Linux was supposed to completely rule the netbook market...

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Business Computers
by unoengborg on Mon 22nd Aug 2011 13:41 in reply to "RE[2]: Business Computers"
unoengborg Member since:
2005-07-06

"The RH guy was talking about the future.

So suffix many of your points with the word 'yet' and suddenly what he is saying makes a lot of sense.


That prediction was already made for netbooks.

Of course, that was a cool thing to say when Linux was supposed to completely rule the netbook market...
"

The netbook market died because it was too expensive to support both Linux and Windows. The solution was to put Windows on the netbooks, and to make that work the netbooks needed more memory and hard drive. That together with the price of a windows license quickly made these devices too expensive for the consumer, that preferred a low end normal laptop with better performance.

To break a dominant OS platform you will need new incompatible hardware, in this case ARM to allow for the new OS to grow without too much competition from Windows. This is how shift from IBM mainframes to PC:s and windowds happened. The shift from x86 to ARM will do the same thing for Android and iOS.

Reply Parent Score: 3