Linked by David Adams on Mon 22nd Aug 2011 22:54 UTC, submitted by Unios
A serious-looking (German Language) article examines a rather preposterous claim: that a group of young hackers has produced "the first operating system that allows problems to run programs from Windows, Mac, [iOS] and Linux with only one system." Their outlandish claims ("every known program runs under UNIOS without driver issues!") drew interest from the local press, then skepticism. I wasn't able to find much information in the English language. So stay tuned here at OSNews, which will no doubt be covering ongoing industry-changing UniOS news as it breaks. Or not.
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Laurence
Member since:
2007-03-26


He's telling the press that he and his friends have written 52 millionen lines of code in three years, but he won't show it. And the press praises him as the next Bill Gates.


Bill Gates was more a businessman than a software developer. I know he has written software (though I'm sure we'd all like to forget about QBasic), but the majority of stuff in the early days was bought.

Reply Parent Score: 2

jbauer Member since:
2005-07-06

"
He's telling the press that he and his friends have written 52 millionen lines of code in three years, but he won't show it. And the press praises him as the next Bill Gates.


Bill Gates was more a businessman than a software developer. I know he has written software (though I'm sure we'd all like to forget about QBasic), but the majority of stuff in the early days was bought.
"

I used to think that way. I have a lot more of respect for the guy as a programmer since I read this Joel Spolsky's little story:

http://www.joelonsoftware.com/items/2006/06/16.html

Reply Parent Score: 2

Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26


I used to think that way. I have a lot more of respect for the guy as a programmer since I read this Joel Spolsky's little story:

http://www.joelonsoftware.com/items/2006/06/16.html

To be honest I was expecting something more impressive than that. That link doesn't really boast about Bill's history as a programmer.

I know the guy is intelligent and understands technology exceedingly well. I also know (and did even highlight this) that he used to get his hands dirty with code, however that doesn't mean that he was one of the key developers for any of their flagship products, let alone an OS developer. Which is why I raised the point about other OS "developers" being compared against him.

I do have a lot of respect for Bill. I may not like many of his business decisions nor personally a fan of Windows, but I've always had a great deal of respect for him because he had vision and was exceedingly good at what he did.

Edited 2011-08-24 09:47 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

reez Member since:
2006-06-28

Bill Gates was more a businessman than a software developer. I know he has written software (though I'm sure we'd all like to forget about QBasic), but the majority of stuff in the early days was bought.

I don't think that's right. It is just what Linus and GNU folks claim. It's not like you can't be both and I never found any evidence for this.

Bill Gates wouldn't be the only one who changes from being a compsci geek to a business geek. It is what happens if you have a lot of financial success.

I am not a big Bill Gates fan though, so I don't know too much about it. Maybe someone could write something to substantiate this allegation.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26


I don't think that's right. It is just what Linus and GNU folks claim. It's not like you can't be both and I never found any evidence for this.

Bill Gates wouldn't be the only one who changes from being a compsci geek to a business geek. It is what happens if you have a lot of financial success.

I am not a big Bill Gates fan though, so I don't know too much about it. Maybe someone could write something to substantiate this allegation.

My comment was more in reference to the comment about how OS developers are compared to Gates despite the fact that, aside Microsoft Basic (which technically is an interpreter and not an OS), he hasn't really had had a major development roll. DOS and Xenix were bought and all of their later developments Gates was too immersed in the business side of things to do line-by-line revision (let alone development) like he had done in the early days.

I'm not trying to take anything away from Gates - he knew his stuff (and still does). But he's just not the best example of an OS developer in my opinion.

Edited 2011-08-24 18:32 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3