Linked by umad on Thu 25th Aug 2011 22:51 UTC
Apple I thought OSNews would be a good forum to talk about a matter that has been weighing on my mind lately primarily because the site has been so focused on Apple's patents and litigation as of late. The news that HP, the largest PC manufacturer in the world is spinning off or getting out of this business is what really prompted me to write this article.
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RE: Too much misinformation
by Tony Swash on Fri 26th Aug 2011 00:03 UTC in reply to "Too much misinformation"
Tony Swash
Member since:
2009-08-22

This is the most arrogant lacking research editorial I have ever read from you. You are blaming Microsoft for something that was inevitable because of the openess of the IBM architecture and the work that took place in the industry to reverse engineers IBM's hardware to create an open architecture upon which the PC industry was built. Of course, Microsoft's early work with IBM and strategic licensing deal and clauses allowed the company to license PC-DOS to IBM and MS-DOS to anyone else. A recent article on PCMag even detailed why IBM chose not to use the Motorola CPU which was lacking certain 16 bit features that were already being delivered by the Intel 8086.

Also remember that Bill Gates was also exposed to the XEROX Alto and Xerox Star which both had early GUIs which both Microsoft and Apple copied ideas from. An employee who worked on Windows 1.0 said Bill even bought a Xerox Alto for employees to play with and get an idea of what he wanted to achieve. To say that Microsoft stole from Apple is very one sided and I guess you suffering from the high Steve Jobs resignation or trying in some way to suck up to get his attention through this 4 paragraph drivel of yours.



Too tired to write much.

Read 'Barbarians Led by Bill Gates' by Marlin Eller, a very senior developer at Microsoft and you will see just how much Bill Gates in particular was obsessed with replicating the Macintosh. No Macintosh would have meant no Windows.

Apple mostly lost because it was very badly managed from almost the moment the Mac project was started. Given the ineptitude of Apple's management (including Steve Jobs who was yet to learn several very painful lessons) its a miracle it survived and a testimony to just how adored the Mac OS was by millions of fans (including yours truly) who stuck with Apple through the ghastly chaotic period from 1984 to 1997.

We are leaving the epoch of the desktop PC behind now. There will be desktop PCs for a long time to come but there importance in the technology ecosystem is collapsing. In the future people will read the history of the PC period and laugh with disbelief at what people had to put up with: system crashes, rampant malware, the BSOD. We are finally leaving the medieval period of information technology behind and what a relief it is.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Too much misinformation
by Dr.Mabuse on Fri 26th Aug 2011 00:44 in reply to "RE: Too much misinformation"
Dr.Mabuse Member since:
2009-05-19

We are leaving the epoch of the desktop PC behind now. There will be desktop PCs for a long time to come but there importance in the technology ecosystem is collapsing. In the future people will read the history of the PC period and laugh with disbelief at what people had to put up with: system crashes, rampant malware, the BSOD. We are finally leaving the medieval period of information technology behind and what a relief it is.


Good grief, not this again.

The bold is my highlighting.

What in your opinion, will we use in the future for:

1/ The design of new Microprocessors
2/ Industrial Design applications (e.g. Toasters, Fridges, Furniture, etc.)
3/ Mechanical Design (Cars, Trains, etc.)
4/ Software Engineering (Not only for PCs, but tablets, smart phones, embedded devices, etc.)
5/ Graphics/Photo Editing
6/ 3D Rendering (Movies, Images, etc.)
7/ Sound Editing (Including composition of Music, etc.)
8/ The ability to administer, deploy and manage these applications on a network (in an office or at home)

...I could go on, but I guess I've made the point...

I can't wait to see the very fancy tablet to accomplish these tasks!

Or maybe we will just amuse ourselves with Angry Birds all day and forgo civilisation? :-)

IMHO - The "PC" in one form or another is the MOST important part of technology for the foreseeable future!

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Too much misinformation
by M.Onty on Fri 26th Aug 2011 07:58 in reply to "RE[2]: Too much misinformation"
M.Onty Member since:
2009-10-23

...I could go on...


Or I could. How about word processing which, it seems to be forgotten, was one of the primary selling points of PCs? As far as I can tell there's been no improvement on this front in this so-called post-PC world.

PC's are not dying or becoming irrelevant; they are finding their level, helpfully assisted by smartphones and tablets. Desks with computers on were never the best place to watch videos, or read magazine articles, or socialise, because its not comfortable, its too formal and tends to render one temporarily miopic.

They became used for these things; now they will be used less for these things and more for the things they were intended for---writing, compositing, analysis, Civilization games---things for which one wants an upright sitting position and the proper focus of staring at a big screen.

We will see a small decline of PC usage then a leveling out. PCs are currently overused, but will prove to be the best tools for most jobs, as opposed to most luxuries. Jobs like playing Civilization, for example.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Too much misinformation
by jal_ on Fri 26th Aug 2011 08:49 in reply to "RE[2]: Too much misinformation"
jal_ Member since:
2006-11-02

Good grief, not this again.
What in your opinion, will we use in the future for:


Though I agree with your general gist, we could very well be using work stations for that, by which I mean more dedicated, more powerful, versions of the "home PC". It may well be we will see a split between consumer devices (tablets) and more professional devices (work stations). I'm not saying we will, but we could.

I can't wait to see the very fancy tablet to accomplish these tasks!


No need. Most of those tasks will not be performed at home. And when talking about Microsoft, they get a large share of their profit from home use. So it may be an important shift.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Too much misinformation
by wargum on Fri 26th Aug 2011 10:54 in reply to "RE[2]: Too much misinformation"
wargum Member since:
2006-12-15

I couldn't agree more. And even if you could bring some of those applications over to a tablet, it would be a hell of a task and take several years and then more years to get it right ;)

Just think about how long it takes for many productivity applications for "small" things like be 64 bit native, be Universal Binary, get ported to Mac, etc.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Tony Swash Member since:
2009-08-22



Good grief, not this again.

The bold is my highlighting.

What in your opinion, will we use in the future for:

1/ The design of new Microprocessors
2/ Industrial Design applications (e.g. Toasters, Fridges, Furniture, etc.)
3/ Mechanical Design (Cars, Trains, etc.)
4/ Software Engineering (Not only for PCs, but tablets, smart phones, embedded devices, etc.)
5/ Graphics/Photo Editing
6/ 3D Rendering (Movies, Images, etc.)
7/ Sound Editing (Including composition of Music, etc.)
8/ The ability to administer, deploy and manage these applications on a network (in an office or at home)

...I could go on, but I guess I've made the point...

I can't wait to see the very fancy tablet to accomplish these tasks!

Or maybe we will just amuse ourselves with Angry Birds all day and forgo civilisation? :-)

IMHO - The "PC" in one form or another is the MOST important part of technology for the foreseeable future!


I suppose it depends on how you define important. Nobody is suggesting that the PC will go away, it's just that it's weight in terms of what drives technology forward, where the money is being made and its overall social and cultural impact is declining.

We have already reached the point where more than half the devices being used to access the internet is non-pc, soon the non-pc devices will represent far more than half.

If you look at your points one by one you get this:

1/ The design of new Microprocessors
2/ Industrial Design applications (e.g. Toasters, Fridges, Furniture, etc.)
3/ Mechanical Design (Cars, Trains, etc.)
4/ Software Engineering (Not only for PCs, but tablets, smart phones, embedded devices, etc.)

True PCs will probably be best for these functions, but in relatively small numbers compared to the numbers of non-pc devices. How many PC will need globally to do this sort of stuff, a few millions perhaps.

5/ Graphics/Photo Editing
6/ 3D Rendering (Movies, Images, etc.)
7/ Sound Editing (Including composition of Music, etc.)


These points I think are more mixed, here many people will find that non-pc devices are perfectly good enough for what they want to do with their music, photos or videos, particularly as the capabilities of such devices improves. Then there will many pros who will use a mix of PC and non-pc such as pro photographers who are adopting the iPad and a complimentary device in large numbers. The same with videos and music.

8/ The ability to administer, deploy and manage these applications on a network (in an office or at home)

Here I think the collapse of the pc paradigm my be surprisingly rapid. In the home come iOS5 for example a pc will no longer be required to administer anything, the same will go for many small and medium sized firms I think.

I think you may be surprised at how rapid the non-pc device revolution is going to be

Reply Parent Score: 2