Linked by David Adams on Mon 29th Aug 2011 14:58 UTC, submitted by Buck Cutburth
Benchmarks The latest browser benchmarks are in... again - seems like there's a new one every week. This is one of the best "browser battle" articles though. Chrome 13, Firefox 6, IE9, Opera 11.50, and Safari 5.1 are put through 40-something tests on both Windows 7 and Mac OS X Lion. As a PC guy I was pretty impressed with the performance of Safari on OS X, and the reader feature looks awesome too. The author also uncovered a nasty Catalyst bug that makes IE9 render pages improperly and freeze up under heavy loads of tabs. The tables at the end pinpoint the strengths and weaknesses of each browser, which is nicer than a 1-10 or star rating. Good article, and thorough.
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aoeuaoeu
by andih on Mon 29th Aug 2011 19:27 UTC
andih
Member since:
2010-03-27

I stumbled upon a irc channel with web developers one day. I asked them about whats the best browser out there,, theese were pros at webpage coding, so I thought these would be able to give some good advice on the matter.

The response was: any.., any is good, just don't use IE.
They all seemed to agree about that.

IE is becoming better I think, thanks to mozilla and the recent excellent competition. But lets continue not using IE. I don't want to see the web crippled by MS again as it was during IE6. That were sad sad times indeed, and the IE6 monopoly of the past still affects the web today in many ways.

Reply Score: 5

RE: aoeuaoeu
by Lennie on Mon 29th Aug 2011 23:15 in reply to "aoeuaoeu"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

Well, that is easily answered, it is already happening.

1. IE9 implements the least amount of standards of all browsers: http://caniuse.com/

I know IE9 supports a lot of things people never expected a few years ago and it is a happy surprise.

But let's say they are at least 3 years behind when just before IE9 was released. And just after they where 1 or 2 years behind. And IE release process is slow in comparison. And deployment of IE-versions is even slower. It takes at least one year for a new version of IE to gain any significant percentage on the market. IE9 in July 2011 has 7 % and IE8 still has 26 %: http://gs.statcounter.com/#browser_version-ww-monthly-201009-201107

What is really sad IE7 until June 2011 had a bigger market share than IE9.

Also see the issue below.

2. Because IE on Windows XP is just IE8 and it will stay IE8 and remain IE8 for many, many, many years to come.

Just as long as it takes for Windows XP to die.

Many people are upset about it: http://html5forxp.com/

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: aoeuaoeu
by ebasconp on Mon 29th Aug 2011 23:54 in reply to "RE: aoeuaoeu"
ebasconp Member since:
2006-05-09

They should install a more modern browser in their boxes instead of getting upset! ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: aoeuaoeu
by lucas_maximus on Tue 30th Aug 2011 11:46 in reply to "RE: aoeuaoeu"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

It is not really that much of a big deal IE8/9 not being that up2date.

Most new semantic elements can be rendered in IE6/7/8 correctly with the shiv technique.

Video and Audio can be replaced with flash ... and a bit of progressive enhancement on a well designed site should mean that it looks pretty decent in most browsers.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: aoeuaoeu
by _xmv on Tue 30th Aug 2011 09:46 in reply to "aoeuaoeu"
_xmv Member since:
2008-12-09

I stumbled upon a irc channel with web developers one day. I asked them about whats the best browser out there,, theese were pros at webpage coding, so I thought these would be able to give some good advice on the matter.

The response was: any.., any is good, just don't use IE.
They all seemed to agree about that.

IE is becoming better I think, thanks to mozilla and the recent excellent competition. But lets continue not using IE. I don't want to see the web crippled by MS again as it was during IE6. That were sad sad times indeed, and the IE6 monopoly of the past still affects the web today in many ways.



Apparently the current trend is chrome trying to cripple the web.
there's more and more "chrome only" websites (not even "webkit only"!) and chrome implements may "so called open standard techs" that they know others will not implement, then implement it server side since they have so many services and attempt to achieve complete web lock-in while covered by the "but we're open and doing this for the right reasons!"

While in reality they're no better than MS.
See SPDY, Native Client, etc.

Reply Parent Score: 3