Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 6th Sep 2011 21:57 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless In the US wireless market, AT&T is currently attempting to buy T-Mobile to create one heck of a behemoth wireless provider. While earlier this week the US government already filed a lawsuit to block the merger, citing antitrust concerns, US carrier Sprint has now also filed a lawsuit to block the merger.
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RE: So ...
by robojerk on Tue 6th Sep 2011 23:45 UTC in reply to "So ..."
robojerk
Member since:
2006-01-10

If T-Mobile had to be bought, I'd rather Sprint buy them.

A triopoly is better than a duopoloy. We're already getting screwed.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: So ...
by kaiwai on Wed 7th Sep 2011 06:33 in reply to "RE: So ..."
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

If T-Mobile had to be bought, I'd rather Sprint buy them.

A triopoly is better than a duopoloy. We're already getting screwed.


It won't matter a single iota until there is a banning of locked phones and you can purchase then outside of the wall garden that the mobile phone companies operate inside the United States. It truly is amazing when I see how the mobile phone companies operate in the US; if they're not raping you by charging the receiving party for a phone call or text message they're turning around and locking off your ability to purchase a phone on the market and then select the carrier with the two choices being independent of each other.

Good lord, don't get me started on coverage - the last thing the US needs is an even more fragmented marketplace. Like I've said, looking at the US is like watching New Zealand and Australia from 15 years ago - its a really bad joke but the average American on this forum thinks (to quote George Carlin) "everything is fine and f-cking dandy!".

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[3]: So ...
by Fennec_Fox on Wed 7th Sep 2011 19:28 in reply to "RE[2]: So ..."
Fennec_Fox Member since:
2006-10-30

... raping you by charging the receiving party for a phone call or text message...


And this would probably be the most glaring example of customer abuse by mobile service providers in North America. Coming from EU, and walking into the store in Canada to get a cell phone, this to me was the biggest shocker... That, and how laughingly small the "home zone" is, beyond which you are being slapped with hefty roaming charges...

Of course you *can* theoretically get a plan with "free" roaming, incoming texts and calls... But the price of such a plan would be heart-attack inducing...

BTW, in Canada we have it even worse - we have only three major telecom suppliers, also in a "lightly regulated" market... To give you an idea how badly Canadians are being raped, and mega-profits telcos are raking in - one of them, Rogers, has just applied with the government to start their own Chartered Bank...

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: So ...
by darknexus on Wed 7th Sep 2011 20:45 in reply to "RE[2]: So ..."
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

It won't matter a single iota until there is a banning of locked phones and you can purchase then outside of the wall garden that the mobile phone companies operate inside the United States.


This is why having more than one option for a GSM carrier is important in this country. I can easily get unlocked GSM phones, and good ones at that. Unlocked phones are not by any means illegal here. True, they're not subsidized, but that's okay by me since it also means the carrier can't try to force me into a ridiculously-priced plan just because I have a certain phone (iPhone plans, anyone?). An added benefit is that I'm not forced to buy a phone loaded down with carrier bloatware.
The trouble with the non-GSM carriers here is twofold. First, they do not use SIM cards, not because CDMA can't have sims but because it's a way for them to lock you in. More importantly though, the two CDMA providers (Verizon and Sprint) use a completely different CDMA frequency and I don't know of any CDMA phone on the market that will handle both. Even if you could get an unlocked CDMA phone, therefore, you're still going to be stuck with only one carrier that'll work with the phone you've bought. In our fucked up CDMA arena, it wouldn't make one bit of difference if we could buy unlocked devices or not, except for allowing you to buy phones with out carrier crapware.
It truly is amazing when I see how the mobile phone companies operate in the US; if they're not raping you by charging the receiving party for a phone call or text message


Yeah, although some of them are finally beginning to drop that. None of the major nation-wide ones, sadly.

they're turning around and locking off your ability to purchase a phone on the market and then select the carrier with the two choices being independent of each other.

If you're referring to the iPhone, you can blame Apple for that. No one held a gun to their corporate collective head and forced them to give AT&T exclusivity, and there's nothing stopping them from selling them unlocked now that said agreement is over. They still choose not to though. It doesn't make sense to me, but I suppose that's why I'm not a corporate bigwig and never want to be.

Good lord, don't get me started on coverage - the last thing the US needs is an even more fragmented marketplace. Like I've said, looking at the US is like watching New Zealand and Australia from 15 years ago - its a really bad joke but the average American on this forum thinks (to quote George Carlin) "everything is fine and f-cking dandy!".


Um, they do? I don't think most of the Americans on this forum thing anything's fine and dandy about this. Now, the average non-technically-inclined American that's been dumbed down by tv is quite another story, but something tells me that you won't find many of those morons here. Be careful not to stereotype too much. That's just what we "average Americans" get accused of doing, after all. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[9]: "Long term" matters
by zima on Tue 13th Sep 2011 23:54 in reply to "RE[2]: So ..."
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

don't get me started on coverage ... its a really bad joke but the average American on this forum thinks (to quote George Carlin) "everything is fine and f-cking dandy!".

The saddest part is all the mind-twisting to justify it... say, that Europe is supposedly ahead in infrastructure cycles thanks to WW2 (as if whole continent was levelled, as if a solid telephone network was the first priority when repairing all the destruction, as if every place didn't need to upgrade recently most of core equipment numerous times to stay in the game). Or insisting that rural levels of the US are comparable to... sub-Saharan Africa (I kid you not), ignoring that suburban sprawl is a matter of choice (which does impact local, interchange-level operations), imagining Europe as some sort of continent-wide urbanized area with half an hour from a random major agglomeration (me, living in the very centre of Europe, I have an hour to anything of note, and 5+ hours to all of nearest three major agglomerations; two of which are in different countries, with loosely connected infrastructures and weak benefits of "radiating" them; with even some quite sparsely inhabited primordial forests and swamps in-between)

...and always ignoring that the "big three" Nordic countries have population densities (all that matters in the end, how many people pay for each proportional part of infrastructure) significantly below that of the US.

PS. One very minor thing, not warranting a separate reply, in one of your other nearby posts...
I've seen it here in NZ - people spending thousands on the latest gadgets but don't have the money to provide a decent lunch or a rain coat for their kid. We live in a strange time where people have warped priorities.

I don't think that's really the case, I don't think that's fair. The past wasn't really better, we just don't have memories of it. "Good old times" is a myth known, in written forms, since the antiquity.
People were starving much more often in the past. And look at all the ornamental folklore artefacts, very valued and cherished now ...but, really, primarily made to look "fancy" (at the time) and, worse, typically very labour intensive.

Edited 2011-09-14 00:12 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

Wrong technology
by wocowboy on Wed 7th Sep 2011 10:32 in reply to "RE: So ..."
wocowboy Member since:
2006-06-01

Sprint uses CDMA technology, a whole different animal than GSM which T-Mobile uses. Sprint would have to change out all the equipment from every T-Mobile cell site at an astronomical cost,and they are not about to do that after the debacle of trying to integrate Nextel into their network that they went through several years ago. It just couldn't e done, and Nextel is just like a vestigial appendage that Sprint can't really use but has to keep around because a very few customers really have to have.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Wrong technology
by robojerk on Wed 7th Sep 2011 16:31 in reply to "Wrong technology"
robojerk Member since:
2006-01-10

I don't know, aren't both planning to deploy LTE networks for their 4G networks?

Reply Parent Score: 3