Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 8th Sep 2011 22:07 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems Remember the Raspberry Pi ARM board we talked about last week? Well, while running Quake III is all fine and dandy and illustrates the board is capable of something, it didn't really tell me anything since I'd guess few people are going to use such a board for gaming. So, I was pleasantly surprised to see that the Raspberry Pi team posted another demo today - running 1080p video for eight hours straight. The chip was still cool to the touch. And just to reiterate: $25.
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RE[4]: "Long term" matters
by Nth_Man on Sat 10th Sep 2011 09:00 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: "Long term" matters"
Nth_Man
Member since:
2010-05-16

> > Don't forget who the audience is here.
> No, I don't forget it. I think that most of them are
> conscientious ones, with experience with some kind
> of monopolies.

I, in all honesty, have no clue how you've arrived at this conclusion. It seems very out of touch, perhaps you'd like to elaborate some?

Well, it has happened to most of us. Have you been in a situation where you depended on a company and you had to pay what they said and wait what they said and suffer bad customer services because you had no other company to go to? Sometimes the monopolistic company makes sure that the cost of going to another company is too high to be an alternative (for example, data migration due to proprietary data formats + retraining + etc). About state monopolies, yes, they are also monopolies and most of us have suffered similar problems.

Edited 2011-09-10 09:03 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: "Long term" matters
by Nth_Man on Sat 10th Sep 2011 09:02 in reply to "RE[4]: "Long term" matters"
Nth_Man Member since:
2010-05-16

First, there's no way for a monopoly to happen with this type of device

Privative software allows vendor lock-ins, for example, that is why the prior user was talking about privative software.

However, it completely disregards the reality of the market that already exists and what we've observed thus far.

We have seen a lot of software monopolies, for example. Microsoft was found guilty and convicted, at least three times :-( for paying people to create problems to others, as you can see in the following link and in the antitrust case, in trials in USA and also in Europe.
http://antitrust.slated.org/www.iowaconsumercase.org/011607/2000/PX...

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: "Long term" matters
by ilovebeer on Sat 10th Sep 2011 23:43 in reply to "RE[5]: "Long term" matters"
ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

"However, it completely disregards the reality of the market that already exists and what we've observed thus far.

We have seen a lot of software monopolies, for example. Microsoft was found guilty and convicted, at least three times :-( for paying people to create problems to others, as you can see in the following link and in the antitrust case, in trials in USA and also in Europe.
http://antitrust.slated.org/www.iowaconsumercase.org/011607/2000/PX...
"

I'm wondering if I need to point out why that's a bad example. I have a feeling you read how that antitrust case started but not how it ended.

Reply Parent Score: 1