Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 17th Sep 2011 00:18 UTC
Windows In the article on Windows 8, I already mentioned that in order to demonstrate the viability of Metro for something other than Facebook and Twitter, Microsoft should come up with a Metro interface for Microsoft Office - one that doesn't leave out 90% of Office's features. Well, Microsoft has hinted that they are, indeed, working on Metro Office. In addition, it turns out Microsoft isn't entirely sure to how to address the issue if legacy applications on ARM.
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Anyone an expert in everything?
by 3rdalbum on Sat 17th Sep 2011 07:38 UTC
3rdalbum
Member since:
2008-05-26

Is everyone here an expert in everything? Or an advanced user of everything?

Well, here's a newsflash for you. Not everyone actually has an interest in computers. Not everyone finds Windows or Linux as easy to use as you. Some people get frustrated when using a computer because it feels like there's too much complexity and it makes them feel inferior or uncertain because they don't really know too much about what they're doing.

I haven't used any Metro interface, but people have been complaining that it's "too dumbed-down", with the implication that "people should just learn as much about computers as I have".

That's a dumb point of view - sorry, but it is. If you don't like Metro, don't use it. You have that option. But by opposing its development you're trying to exclude people from being able to use computers. Metro could possibly help "computer-illiterate" people to actually accomplish more with their computers and feel more confident doing so.

To use an analogy, it's like insisting that everyone be made to drive manual transmission cars that require double-clutching and controlling the engine revs when changing gear, like they used to do in the olden days. Because anyone who can't do that is an iDiot and shouldn't be allowed to drive. Right? Oh, and get rid of that starter motor - hand cranking is good enough.

Reply Score: 3

Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

3rdalbum,


"I haven't used any Metro interface, but people have been complaining that it's 'too dumbed-down' ... That's a dumb point of view - sorry, but it is. If you don't like Metro, don't use it. You have that option."


You profess to have no experience with it and yet you judge the opinions of those of us who've tried it? Good grief.

And no, personally I don't dislike it because it emphasizes a single application interface over a multi-window one. What sucks is metro's implementation of a single-window interface. Metro's implementation it's just awful, illogical, confusing.

"But by opposing its development you're trying to exclude people from being able to use computers. Metro could possibly help "computer-illiterate" people to actually accomplish more with their computers and feel more confident doing so."

I don't think anybody said this, the problem is that metro is just as confusing as what it replaced. There is no harmony between metro mode and standard modes. Eliminating chrome actually hurts user navigation and increases the learning curve. Efficient workflow between metro/desktop is impossible.

"To use an analogy, "

Here is a better car analogy:

Metro, as it stands in the preview, is like a road network, only all the signs have been taken down. You have no idea where you are, no idea where you can go. You either have to recognize your surroundings from memory or drive around randomly until you get somewhere.

Reply Parent Score: 2

FealDorf Member since:
2008-01-07

Well, I have used metro and I'd disagree. Metro will be godsend to most laymen. If anything, it's unfamiliar.

>> What sucks is metro's implementation of a single-window interface. Metro's implementation it's just awful, illogical, confusing.
I'm genuinely interested as to why you believe so. GUIs on windows are already an inconsistent mess.

The only real complaint about metro would be a complaint with all touch-interfaces -- they're not discoverable. The prime advantage that WIMP-based GUIs have over CLIs is precisely that you don't need to RTFM. That said, with cryptic and tiny icons, modal interfaces most of this advantage is lost. Even so, Metro has strict guidelines including for gestures as well, so I have more hope for it.

Reply Parent Score: 1

M.Onty Member since:
2009-10-23

To use an analogy, it's like insisting that everyone be made to drive manual transmission cars that require double-clutching and controlling the engine revs when changing gear, like they used to do in the olden days. Because anyone who can't do that is an iDiot and shouldn't be allowed to drive. Right?


Most of the rest of the world out side of the USA still drives manual rather than automatic. In the UK almost everyone learns manual, and almost everyone can drive. So what your analogy really suggests is that if people find something mildly difficult you should take it away; even if pretty much everyone is capable of learning to use it and, consequently, of using the machine more efficiently and broadening their options should they ever wish to go somewhere a bit out of their comfort zone.

Reply Parent Score: 2