Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 20th Sep 2011 21:46 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Ever since Honeycomb's release, Android has had two versions out in the wild (well, if you disregard the non-current versions, that is). The next major Android release, Ice Cream Sandwich, is supposed to fix this problem by having one single version of Android for both phones and tablets. Google now has a blog post up which presents some options for developers to prepare their applications for Ice Cream Sandwich.
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anevilyak
Member since:
2005-09-14

The issue in the OP's case is that the apps in question are installed on the OS partition. As a security measure, Android mounts the system partition read-only, with a separate read/write one for apps. As a consequence, the apps which live on said system partition can't be removed. (Note that poor choice of partitioning scheme is why some android phones also have lackluster amounts of storage available for app installation).

Reply Parent Score: 2

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

That is interesting as I've not looked at how android devices are partitions. Good to hear they are similar to Maemo partitioning though.

I don't see that this changes anything though. Who put theapps in place? Are these social media client applications that are part of the stock Android distribution or are they post Google additions that the menufacturer has dropped on the device before shipping it to the customer.

If google made social media apps a required components of Android then booo Google! Have at it.

If xyz-phones made social media apps a required component of the mobile phone which happens to also run Android then booo xyz-phones Incororated! You can't blame Android and Google for what OS curruptions the manufacturer put in place while assembling the device.

In this case, if they OP's phone had these apps which are imposed by the phone manufacturer not the Android OS then they should have shopped around and baught from a different phone manufactuer; hense, it is an issue to take up with the phone manufacturer not the OS developer.

Trust me, I'm no Android fan but watching any OS get slammed for things outside of the developer's control doesn't sit well. Especially when the customer has/had solutions available.

Reply Parent Score: 2

anevilyak Member since:
2005-09-14

At least some of them are part of the base android install, i.e. Facebook and Twitter are both present in the stock Gingerbread images used on the Nexus devices. I haven't messed with the alternate builds that Motorola/HTC/Samsung make so I don't know what others they might bundle.

Reply Parent Score: 2