Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 23rd Sep 2011 15:45 UTC
Internet & Networking It might be common, but that doesn't mean I'm not allowed to wail against it - especially since I was not familiar with this particular case. As it turns out, several of Adobe products' download pages have opt-out checkboxes to also install Google Chrome. This was spyware-like behaviour when Apple did it with Safari and the iPhone Configuration Utility, and it is still spyware-like behaviour when Adobe and Google do it with Chrome.
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Comment by Alex Hitech
by Alex Hitech on Fri 23rd Sep 2011 16:04 UTC
Alex Hitech
Member since:
2005-12-29

Well, that just means the users should learn to read carefully and to understand what they're doing. In fact, it's good and beneficial for the users who are finally forced to read and to take responsibility for their choices. In particular, I don't see anything bad in bundling, at least while there exists an option to deselect the unwanted software.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by Alex Hitech
by vodoomoth on Fri 23rd Sep 2011 16:37 in reply to "Comment by Alex Hitech"
vodoomoth Member since:
2010-03-30

Come on! Why would the user need to deselect anything? When you order something, you don't want anything extra to be included in the check. There's an adjective for that: "unwanted". At least, that how I see it, even when factoring in the fact that Chrome is free.

Your reasoning seems to be along the lines of "malware will teach users not to click links in messages from people they don't know." No.

Reply Parent Score: 9

RE[2]: Comment by Alex Hitech
by WorknMan on Fri 23rd Sep 2011 17:35 in reply to "RE: Comment by Alex Hitech"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

Come on! Why would the user need to deselect anything? When you order something, you don't want anything extra to be included in the check. There's an adjective for that: "unwanted".


It's actually called 'bundleware'. If they were bundling some sort of ad toolbar or something, most would consider it a nuisance and/or unwanted crap. But since it's Chrome they're bundling instead of adware, then apparently that's ok.

Having said that, I don't find this quite as offensive as Apple installing bundleware as part of their update software. For better or worse, bundleware in installers is pretty common practice these days, but you don't really expect that from an updater.

Reply Parent Score: 2