Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 23rd Sep 2011 15:45 UTC
Internet & Networking It might be common, but that doesn't mean I'm not allowed to wail against it - especially since I was not familiar with this particular case. As it turns out, several of Adobe products' download pages have opt-out checkboxes to also install Google Chrome. This was spyware-like behaviour when Apple did it with Safari and the iPhone Configuration Utility, and it is still spyware-like behaviour when Adobe and Google do it with Chrome.
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RE[3]: Comment by Kroc
by _xmv on Sat 24th Sep 2011 02:52 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Kroc"
_xmv
Member since:
2008-12-09

The Windows Phone Marketplace has no such rules against duplication of existing functionality. It's highly unlikely the Windows 8 Store will contain such restrictions.

Correct. Firefox and Chrome run on W8, but not in Metro mode.
Eventually however, they could be phased out (or Windows/OSX phased out by Chrome OS, etc).

The deal here is that the one who has the major HTML engine, being Metro, Chrome, or Firefox (taking the biggest guys only here), will control the web standards.
Like MS did with IE. And if Google or MS control the web standards, it will go on a path that is going to be incompatible and drive their own unique interest. (I doubt Mozilla can win that, they just want a share of it so that the web doesnt fall under corporations control)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by Kroc
by n4cer on Sun 25th Sep 2011 04:54 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Kroc"
n4cer Member since:
2005-07-06

"The Windows Phone Marketplace has no such rules against duplication of existing functionality. It's highly unlikely the Windows 8 Store will contain such restrictions.

Correct. Firefox and Chrome run on W8, but not in Metro mode.
Eventually however, they could be phased out (or Windows/OSX phased out by Chrome OS, etc).

The deal here is that the one who has the major HTML engine, being Metro, Chrome, or Firefox (taking the biggest guys only here), will control the web standards.
Like MS did with IE. And if Google or MS control the web standards, it will go on a path that is going to be incompatible and drive their own unique interest. (I doubt Mozilla can win that, they just want a share of it so that the web doesnt fall under corporations control)
"

Metro isn't an HTML engine. If you're talking about the Metro version of IE, it's just IE 10 with Metro chrome and fewer features exposed (e.g., no plugin support).

Chrome and Firefox don't run in the Metro environment because they haven't been coded to integrate with it yet. Google, Mozilla, et al., are free to build a Metro-style interface for their browser engines as MS has done for IE. In Mozilla's case, there is already an investigation as to the best approach.
http://www.brianbondy.com/blog/tagged/windows8/

Reply Parent Score: 2