Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 27th Sep 2011 19:45 UTC, submitted by lemur2
Mozilla & Gecko clones Mozilla has released Firefox 7. Unlike releases of Firefox 5 and Firefox 6 which were relatively minor upgrades to the browser, Firefox 7 includes a number of significant improvements, most important of which is probably the drastically reduced memory usage.
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RE: Stop breaking plugins
by lemur2 on Tue 27th Sep 2011 22:57 UTC in reply to "Stop breaking plugins"
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

It's the features added by extensions that keep me faithful to Firefox. I don't have the solution, but it's a real problem. With every upgrade one or more addons that I use is disabled and makes the new improved version of Firefox feel like a step backward.


I've never had any problem, except for the Australian dictionary. I simply used the GB dictionary instead. In addition for one update, one of my addons wasn't available for a week or so.

The significant majority of the addons hosted on addons.mozilla.org should work after an update, since Mozilla automatically verifies them for compatibility.

Just let them update.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Stop breaking plugins
by sorpigal on Thu 29th Sep 2011 18:28 in reply to "RE: Stop breaking plugins"
sorpigal Member since:
2005-11-02

It's nice that it Works For You, but that's no answer to the problem of what to do when it doesn't work.

My experience is like the grandparent: Every FF update breaks at least one extension that I use daily. It's a good thing that I can control when I update so that I can delay upgrading until all my extensions have been updated. Oh, wait! Apparently FF updates never break anything, so Mozilla is going to make it all transparent, automatic and impossible to opt out of. Well that's good news; it's not as if I ever have to worry about testing my web sites on older versions of the engine... oh, wait.

You get the idea.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Stop breaking plugins
by lemur2 on Thu 29th Sep 2011 23:09 in reply to "RE[2]: Stop breaking plugins"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

It's nice that it Works For You, but that's no answer to the problem of what to do when it doesn't work. My experience is like the grandparent: Every FF update breaks at least one extension that I use daily. It's a good thing that I can control when I update so that I can delay upgrading until all my extensions have been updated. Oh, wait! Apparently FF updates never break anything, so Mozilla is going to make it all transparent, automatic and impossible to opt out of. Well that's good news; it's not as if I ever have to worry about testing my web sites on older versions of the engine... oh, wait. You get the idea.


Addons are actually compatible 99% of the time. Addons hosted at Mozilla's site, addons.mozilla.org, are automatically tested and updated by Mozilla. One would be quite unlucky to have one of the 1% of addons (from addons.mozilla.org) that was not automatically compatible after an update.

So the "problem" is this ... the majority of addons, especially with Windows users, don't actually come from addons.mozilla.org. Up to 75% of addons in use are outside of Mozilla's direct influence, Mozilla can't do anything about them. Currently Firefox takes the approach of extreme caution and disables these "external to Mozilla" addons, it doesn't just assume they will still work with a new version of the browser unless the addons specifically indicate that they will. People have to update these "external to Mozilla" addons seperately.

Instead of doing that, people just jump on Internet forums and complain that "Firefox update broke my addon". Sigh!

OK, so what to do about it. There are basically three options:

1. First and foremost, go the source (external to addons.mozilla.org) of the addon which has been disabled after a Firefox update, and see if there is a corresponding update for the addon. If there is, download it and install it (by opening the .xpi file in Firefox). Sweet.

2. If the source of the addon hasn't updated it, it is still quite likely that the old version of the addon will still work, and that Firefox has been overly cautious in marking it as disabled. To override this, install an addon from addons.mozilla.org called the "Addon Compatibility Reporter". Within this addon is the ability to enable older addons that Firefox has disabled after an update. So use the Addon Compatibility Reporter to mark the old disabled addon as enabled once again, and try it. In the vast majority of cases (perhaps up to 99% of cases), the old addon will still work with the new Firefox version.

3. If the old addon doesn't work, and the original source of the old addon won't be updating it, then have a look around. There are literally many thousands of addons available for Firefox. It is quite likely that with a bit of effort you can find a suitable replacement.

Hope this helps.

Edited 2011-09-29 23:12 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2