Linked by David Adams on Thu 29th Sep 2011 23:47 UTC, submitted by lucas_maximus
Linux Linux is struggling on the desktop because it only has a small number of "great" apps, according to the Gnome co-creator. Miguel de Icaza, co-creator of the Gnome desktop, told tech journalist Tim Anderson at the recent Windows 8 Build conference "When you count how many great desktop apps there are on Linux, you can probably name 10," de Icaza said, according to a post on Anderson's IT Writing blog. "You work really hard, you can probably name 20. We've managed to p*** off developers every step of the way, breaking APIs all the time."
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RE: just to make a point
by clasqm on Fri 30th Sep 2011 07:58 UTC in reply to "just to make a point"
clasqm
Member since:
2010-09-23

The ability to truly use the system as a user, protecting the OS as a whole from system wide compromise.


Nothing shows up the Linux mentality like this does. The easily re-installed OS and easily re-installed apps must be protected at all costs. But my documents that I've written over the last two decades, the pictures of my kids, my collections of music and films, the digital record of my whole friggin' LIFE, well that can be blown away. It's all about the machine, not the user.

Sure, it's a valid way to run a system. But don't tout it as an advantage to the user.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: just to make a point
by r_a_trip on Fri 30th Sep 2011 12:53 in reply to "RE: just to make a point"
r_a_trip Member since:
2005-07-06

So, tell me, how well do Windows and OS X, as a pure OS, protect your own files in case of a malware infection? My guess, not to good.

The protection of your own unique files is called back up. There are additions that can be bundled with/installed on an OS, like Time Machine, TimeVault and Genie Timeline which make this easy. However, this is not a function of the OS itself.

I hope you realise that your own base system doesn't do anything to keep your own files safe and that you have back up mechanisms in place to guard against potential file loss.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: just to make a point
by moondevil on Fri 30th Sep 2011 18:14 in reply to "RE[2]: just to make a point"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

The same was as any UNIX based OS, with proper user rights. It is there since Windows NT 3.51, it is just a matter of proper configuration.

Reply Parent Score: 2