Linked by David Adams on Thu 29th Sep 2011 23:47 UTC, submitted by lucas_maximus
Linux Linux is struggling on the desktop because it only has a small number of "great" apps, according to the Gnome co-creator. Miguel de Icaza, co-creator of the Gnome desktop, told tech journalist Tim Anderson at the recent Windows 8 Build conference "When you count how many great desktop apps there are on Linux, you can probably name 10," de Icaza said, according to a post on Anderson's IT Writing blog. "You work really hard, you can probably name 20. We've managed to p*** off developers every step of the way, breaking APIs all the time."
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RE: Unfortunately true
by lemur2 on Fri 30th Sep 2011 11:08 UTC in reply to "Unfortunately true"
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

What's this stuff about "We don't need stable APIs. we don't need binary compatibility"? How many people actually want to waste hours and hours compiling a huge desktop application so it works on their computer


Linux users don't need a stable API in order to avoid having to spend hours and hours compiling a huge desktop application so it works on their computer.

http://packages.ubuntu.com/oneiric/blender

Just install it with the package manager.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Unfortunately true
by zlynx on Mon 3rd Oct 2011 17:22 in reply to "RE: Unfortunately true"
zlynx Member since:
2005-07-20

Only works if someone else packaged it for that distribution.

Have fun trying to run an older application that no one cared about.

I remember trying to build XTank and NetTrek for Linux back in 2001 I think. Not fun.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Unfortunately true
by lemur2 on Tue 4th Oct 2011 01:45 in reply to "RE[2]: Unfortunately true"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Only works if someone else packaged it for that distribution. Have fun trying to run an older application that no one cared about. I remember trying to build XTank and NetTrek for Linux back in 2001 I think. Not fun.


One would have more ability to take XTank and NetTrek and improve on them than one would for any commercial game.

There are literally tens of thousands of packages in Debian/Ubuntu repositories, and in the case of Ubuntu, perhaps a hundred thousand more in external repositories such as launchpad.

The thing with Linux is that for the majority of packages available for it, one CAN compile the source. Legally. If one wants to. For the majority of packages for Windows, one can't.

Out of the two scenarios, the former is better than the latter for users.

Reply Parent Score: 2