Linked by David Adams on Thu 29th Sep 2011 23:47 UTC, submitted by lucas_maximus
Linux Linux is struggling on the desktop because it only has a small number of "great" apps, according to the Gnome co-creator. Miguel de Icaza, co-creator of the Gnome desktop, told tech journalist Tim Anderson at the recent Windows 8 Build conference "When you count how many great desktop apps there are on Linux, you can probably name 10," de Icaza said, according to a post on Anderson's IT Writing blog. "You work really hard, you can probably name 20. We've managed to p*** off developers every step of the way, breaking APIs all the time."
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Member since:
2008-09-11


Linux developers needs to listen to Miguel a lot more because he is talking sense.

Step 1: Make it easy to program for Linux, using modern programming languages.

Step 2: Provide stable API's and ABI's so that programs will work for a long time without excessive maintenance.

Step 3: Test the programs before releasing.



Step 4: Focus on a toolkit not 100, focus on a single graphics stack not 100, focus at a single app/app group. No need to reinvent the wheel 1000 times.

Step 5: Use some good programming languages. Python and Shell Scripting aren't for general software development, really. They are for frustrated foss enthusiasts too lazy/incapable to learn something actually good for desktop/system programming.

Step 6: Try to implement a good system architecture. I.e. ALSA is a mess, X11 is a mess, Pulse Audio is a mess, HAL is a mess, Init is a mess, CUPS is a mess, udev is a mess.

Step 7: If ain't good, don't release it. The world doesn't need yet another window manager, yet another text editor, and so on. The fact that you can apt-get or yum install everything from a central repository doesn't make for the fact of that repository being full of crapware.

Step 8: Optimize, make it work. Too much slowness, too many crashes.

Step 9: Stable API, Stable ABI.

Step 10: Stable API, Stable ABI.

....................................................

Step 1000: Stable API, Stable ABI.

Reply Parent Score: 1

WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

Step 5: Use some good programming languages. Python and Shell Scripting aren't for general software development, really. They are for frustrated foss enthusiasts too lazy/incapable to learn something actually good for desktop/system programming.


Better yet, make your API/toolkit language-agnostic, so I can use whatever the hell I want to program in, and then compile down to a native executable, no matter what language I choose.

On Windows, my language of choice is actually AutoIt. It's probably got 1/10th the power of perl or python, but does everything I need it to do 95% of the time, and can generate small, native .exe files.

Edited 2011-10-01 02:19 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Step 4: Focus on a toolkit not 100


For all practicalpurposes there are only two: qt and gtk.

focus on a single graphics stack not 100


There aren't hundred graphics stacks.

Python and Shell Scripting aren't for general software development, really.


No? Way to show your ignorance. That's like saying VB.net is not a language for real development.

They are for frustrated foss enthusiasts too lazy/incapable to learn something actually good for desktop/system programming.


It's obvious that you've never used either and really, no-one is using shell as a desktop programming language. Python's just fine though.

If ain't good, don't release it.

Well, I guess it would be good to do something the commercial development houses do not.

Reply Parent Score: 5