Linked by David Adams on Mon 17th Oct 2011 17:29 UTC, submitted by Debjit
Windows Well, its not official yet, but Microsoft's Windows 7 has now become the most widely used operating system. . . Windows 7 now has a strong 40.21% share of all desktop operating systems around the world whereas, the usage share of Windows XP has slipped to 38.64%. All this happened a couple of days back (in October). The rise in usage of Windows 7 and the drop in usage of Windows XP has been consistent since the time Windows 7 was first launched.
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RE[3]: I don't believe that
by BlueofRainbow on Tue 18th Oct 2011 01:32 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: I don't believe that"
BlueofRainbow
Member since:
2009-01-06

I would also concur that the web surfing statistics likely do not reflect the installed based.

Nevertheless, a few interesting twists:

i) Windows 7 has been globally encountered more often than Windows Vista for quite some time. In many areas, OS X is also more prevalent than Windows Vista.

ii) The shift to Windows 7 likely reflects hardware replacement.....the last systems build and sold with Windows XP (not as a downgrade from Vista) are roughly 3-1/2 to 4 years old. As application developers are likely coding for the more recent hardware/software platform, the older XP based systems are felt lagging (or simply breaks down and can't be repaired).

iii) It would be more informative if the statistics could be broken down into the Home vs. Professional versions of Windows XP and the Home/Home Premium vs. Professional/Ultimate versions of Windows 7. This would tell general public vs. corporate base.

iv) The low frequency of encounters of Linux based systems is rather puzzling - maybe the Linux users don't frequent the same sites as the rest of users?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: I don't believe that
by westlake on Tue 18th Oct 2011 02:30 in reply to "RE[3]: I don't believe that"
westlake Member since:
2010-01-07

I would also concur that the web surfing statistics likely do not reflect the installed based.

iv) The low frequency of encounters of Linux based systems is rather puzzling - maybe the Linux users don't frequent the same sites as the rest of users?


It doesn't matter much whether you look at the webstats from W3Schools, Net Applications, Statcounter or any other recogizable source.

Linux has fallen off the edge of the world.

Its trendline has flatlined.

The reasons are many.

FOSS programs are routinely ported to Windows or begin as native Windows apps.

No iTunes. No Netflix. No games.

No retail presence in the states.

Wamart.com alone stocks over 400 flavors of the Windows PC and laptop, none of them high-end product.

There is nothing to be gained by complaining about the methodology used to collect these stats.

Net Applications' clients include Apple, Microsoft, the Moz Foundation, Opera, Red Hat, the New York Times, the WSJ and so on.

From the Net Applications FAQ.

We collect data from the browsers of site visitors to our exclusive on-demand network of HitsLink Analytics and SharePost clients. The network includes over 40,000 websites, and spans the globe. We ‘count’ unique visitors to our network sites, and only count one unique visit to each network site per day. This is part of our quality control process to prevent fraud, and ensure the most accurate portrayal of Internet usage market share. The data is compiled from approximately 160 million unique visits per month. The information published on www.netmarketshare.com is an aggregation of the data from this network of hosted website traffic statistics. In addition, we classify 430+ referral sources identified as search engines. Aggregate traffic referrals from these engines are summarized and reported monthly. The statistics for search engines include both organic and sponsored referrals.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: I don't believe that
by zima on Tue 18th Oct 2011 06:43 in reply to "RE[4]: I don't believe that"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

No iTunes. No Netflix. No games.

And the first two aren't really much of an issue, in most places; doesn't change much. Similarly, people who are into games seem to be a minority... (especially when excluding PC gamers of flash/browser-based games)

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: I don't believe that
by dusanyu on Thu 20th Oct 2011 18:21 in reply to "RE[4]: I don't believe that"
dusanyu Member since:
2006-01-21

Most people "work" out of the browser these days operating system has become a mute point.

i find it funny how quick people are to bash Linux over its desktop share

there are probably more Linux users out there than anything when you count Servers, Phones, Cars, TV's set top boxes

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: I don't believe that
by zima on Tue 18th Oct 2011 06:01 in reply to "RE[3]: I don't believe that"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Nevertheless, a few interesting twists:
i) Windows 7 has been globally encountered more often than Windows Vista for quite some time.

A natural consequence of far from enthusiastic Vista reception - similar with WinMe, it quickly vanished (and IMHO, it wasn't nearly so bad as popularly portrayed ...as long as one remembered what it was: still 9x of course, but a slightly too big departure from 98 & 98SE for all the old tricks to work - instead, they often broke the system)

In many areas, OS X is also more prevalent than Windows Vista.

How do you come to that conclusion? In areas from Statcounter, broken per continent*, OSX virtually doesn't exist in Africa, Asia, and South America. It's visible in Europe, but there Vista still has over 2x more than OSX. In North America, Vista still has a bit more.
Only in Oceania OSX has a bit more than Vista (but then, Win7 has there almost 2x more than XP; clearly a very atypical area)
So "many areas" would basically mean from two to few countries...

*though such regional breakdown is really awkward - it shouldn't follow geographical boundaries the way it does, but cultural and geopolitical ones.

So, for example, CIS countries in one group, counted separately from "Europe" (it would need some more politically correct name, EU or EEA being too narrow ;) ). Canada & US in one, Latin America in another. Australia & New Zealand separate from the rest of Oceania (right now those two countries most likely totally dominate the results)

iii) It would be more informative if the statistics could be broken down into the Home vs. Professional versions [...] This would tell general public vs. corporate base.

Not necessarily. I know of few places which hardly bothered with XP Home, for example - which seemed to be correlated with widespread piracy (no price difference there, and two versions would only complicate things?) - and they would be most likely also the places with much slower Win7 uptake.

iv) The low frequency of encounters of Linux based systems is rather puzzling - maybe the Linux users don't frequent the same sites as the rest of users?

This (and also institutional deployments) might play some role, but - look at the stats of Wikimedia, which I link nearby.

Generally - this, and your ii) point, probably boils down to people being quite satisfied with perfectly "good enough" OS which comes on their new PC (typically even even somewhat better than the Linux experience would be, especially considering familiarity factor; some negative experiences of Windows accepted as unavoidable part of computing, and its price being hidden)

Reply Parent Score: 3