Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 22nd Oct 2011 22:24 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Remember back when Nokia jumped to Windows Phone 7, abandoning all other platforms and future directions? Remember Elop's infamous 'burning platform' memo was coveniently 'leaked' to the web? Remember how Elop claimed Windows Phone 7 was the only way forward, since nothing else inside the company would be ready for prime time soon enough? Remember how I thought this was a very good and sane decision? Well, the first reviews of what will be the only MeeGo handset from Nokia (the N9) are in, and well... To whoever decided to go WP7 and ditch MeeGo: I don't like you. To myself: I'm an idiot for arguing this was a good idea.
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CapEnt
Member since:
2005-12-18

Don't be so fast at dismissing C++ on the basis of "tools are lacking". The long history of C++ as a strong industrial language created one of the most vast development ecosystem that a programmer can dream of.

Hardly you can beat the richness of libraries that C++ can offer to you. And good C++ code can be reusable, maintainable and scalable.

The sole problem (if it is a problem) is that C++ makes easier for inexperienced programmers to shoot itself in the foot.

But kragil is also right: the over reliance that some C#/Java developers has of their IDEs is a very bad habit. Indeed, it is a anti-pattern. The perceived "lack of tools" that some users of managed languages see in C++ is thanks to the coding style that C++ programmers like, who emphasis the knowledge of the language itself, not only the tools that you use to edit it.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29


Hardly you can beat the richness of libraries that C++ can offer to you. And good C++ code can be reusable, maintainable and scalable.


It can be, but its a lot harder and a hell of a lot less common. I think my point is that as a whole, managed programmers for example spend a lot less time fighting with the language, and a lot more time tackling truely high level concepts.


The sole problem (if it is a problem) is that C++ makes easier for inexperienced programmers to shoot itself in the foot.


I think it absolutely is a problem. If parts of the language are terrible, or it lends itself to bad practices, jetisson them from the language. Make a new flavor of C++, hell, call it something else. Just clean the language up, its very unweildly.

But kragil is also right: the over reliance that some C#/Java developers has of their IDEs is a very bad habit. Indeed, it is a anti-pattern. The perceived "lack of tools" that some users of managed languages see in C++ is thanks to the coding style that C++ programmers like, who emphasis the knowledge of the language itself, not only the tools that you use to edit it.



I don't think its so much as an overreliance as it s a willingness to use a convenience. I could just as easy manually run my unit tests from the command line, but it's much better to have continous testing done for me by an extension. I can probably debug myself from the command line, or I can use an IDE to help me view locals, parallel thread stacks, do edit and continue, etc.

It's a tool, its useful. I don't think its bad that programmers expect more nowadays from their toolset. Its less about editing the language (though ReSharper certainly helps in avoiding code smell), its more about augmenting the development cycle.

I don't think C++ is the problem more than tooling is. Given a competent toolchain, something that users can grasp easily, the Linux stack could become a lot nicer to work with.

Instead its an afterthought, and anyone who dares question why is shot down.

Reply Parent Score: 1

sorpigal Member since:
2005-11-02

I don't think its so much as an overreliance as it s a willingness to use a convenience. I could just as easy manually run my unit tests from the command line, but it's much better to have continous testing done for me by an extension. I can probably debug myself from the command line, or I can use an IDE to help me view locals, parallel thread stacks, do edit and continue, etc.

Perhaps for you this is all true but I doubt it's the majority. Lots of hack 'programmers' couldn't use a command line tool if they tried, and to be sure they love VS. Automating what you know how to do is never a problem.

Reply Parent Score: 3

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I think it absolutely is a problem. If parts of the language are terrible, or it lends itself to bad practices, jetisson them from the language. Make a new flavor of C++, hell, call it something else. Just clean the language up, its very unweildly.


http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=OTk2NA

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D_%28programming_language%29

In computing, D is the name of several programming languages, the most popular of which is the D programming language, an object-oriented, imperative, multi-paradigm, system programming language designed by Walter Bright of Digital Mars. It originated as a re-engineering of C++, but even though it is mainly influenced by that language, it is not a variant of C++. D has redesigned some C++ features and has been influenced by concepts used in other programming languages, such as Java, Python, Ruby, C#, and Eiffel.

D is designed with lessons learned from practical C++ usage rather than from a theoretical perspective. Even though it uses many C/C++ concepts it also discards some, and as such is not compatible with C/C++ source code. It adds to the functionality of C++ by also implementing design by contract, unit testing, true modules, garbage collection, first class arrays, associative arrays, dynamic arrays, array slicing, nested functions, inner classes, closures, anonymous functions, compile time function execution, lazy evaluation and has a reengineered template syntax. D retains C++'s ability to do low-level coding, and adds to it with support for an integrated inline assembler. C++ multiple inheritance is replaced by Java style single inheritance with interfaces and mixins. D's declaration, statement and expression syntax closely matches that of C++.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qt_%28framework%29#Bindings

http://www.dsource.org/projects/qtd

Enjoy.

Reply Parent Score: 3