Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 31st Oct 2011 12:59 UTC, submitted by Martin H Hansen
RISC OS Sometimes, on a rather boring and run-of-the-mill Monday, I get news in the submission queue which just puts a gigantic smile on my face. We've talked about the Raspberry Pi before on OSNews, and other than reporting that everything's on track for a Christmas launch, it has also been announced that the Raspberry Pi will be able to run... RISC OS. A British educational ARM board running RISC OS? We have come full circle. And I couldn't be happier. Update: Theo Markettos emailed me with two corrections - Markettos isn't actually a representative of the Raspberry Pi Foundation, and the quoted bits are transcribed, they're not Markettos' literal words. Thanks for clearing that up!
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RE[4]: priorities
by merkoth on Mon 31st Oct 2011 15:53 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: priorities"
merkoth
Member since:
2006-09-22

"Accelerated 2D" is 3D rendering using an orthogonal view.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: priorities
by zima on Mon 7th Nov 2011 21:22 in reply to "RE[4]: priorities"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

When idealized (and towards what present hardware architectures - maybe also R-Pi - converge to, internally), sure.

But, you know, not only 2D / video is something traditionally, for a long time, done by fixed-function, specialised bits of hardware (and libraries, methods, commands oriented for 2D rendering), without any serious possibility to tap those capabilities for 3D.
And not only there are still very clear vestiges of the mentioned separate libraries, methods of accessing 2D vs. 3D.
Even with a HW which doesn't really distinguish internally, and with a compositing WM which directly taps 3D (which Openbox/LXDE doesn't do) - there is still big difference between a stack suitable for "real 3D" (say, the gaming heavyweights mentioned above), and one suitable for desktop (here, OSS drivers are mostly good enough ...even if needlessly requiring more powerful hardware for "good enough" performance; even if, via barely supporting power saving, they waste power - which wouldn't really be a problem for R-Pi, anyway)

Reply Parent Score: 2