Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 1st Nov 2011 21:31 UTC, submitted by Z_God
KDE Disappointed with KDE 4's performance and other shortcomings, Timothy Pearson continued KDE 3.5 development under the name Trinity. Today the first third major update of the Trinity Desktop Environment is released, providing an alternative upgrade path for KDE users who do not feel comfortable with KDE 4.
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RE[3]: What's going on?
by RichterKuato on Wed 2nd Nov 2011 01:47 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: What's going on?"
RichterKuato
Member since:
2010-05-14

His post makes more sense than anyone's. The Linux Desktop isn't losing users to Windows/Mac they just haven't got, relatively speaking, very many users.

I'd like to add that, the reason why is because: One) no one has ever invested enough money in developers and advertising to have a well crafted and marketable enough distribution for consumers and Two) few hardware manufacturers have the competency it takes to create and profit from such a product.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: What's going on?
by wigry on Wed 2nd Nov 2011 11:18 in reply to "RE[3]: What's going on?"
wigry Member since:
2008-10-09

As long as Linux kernel does not offer stability for developers no commercial project is willing to invest into linux development. So far the kernel API-s change too often too radically and nobody wants to rewrite their application every few month.

Next is some stability in user space. Again there is a lots of fragmentation and clutter in Linux, no agreed standards and that frightens the commercial developers away as far as they can go. Windows have had Win32 for ever, the C# and .NET has been around for a long time and people trust these platforms. OS X have its internals stabilized. That is the winning formula.

So Linux is all about innovation and eyecandy and SYSTEM stability but that does not win users. In order to win users, you must win developers and they want stable working environment in a sence of API-s and ABI-s.

Reply Parent Score: -1

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

Develop for a stable parent distributions and let the child forks inheret it instead of trying to target every child fork distribution on the menu. "Not a big deal (tm)"

Heck, Nvidia can deliver a binary blog with an easy setup wizard that installs across multiple parent distributions and I don't see Nvidia as being some kind of blessed bubble of developers.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[5]: What's going on?
by pgeorgi on Wed 2nd Nov 2011 13:24 in reply to "RE[4]: What's going on?"
pgeorgi Member since:
2010-02-18

As long as Linux kernel does not offer stability for developers no commercial project is willing to invest into linux development. So far the kernel API-s change too often too radically and nobody wants to rewrite their application every few month.

Kernel APIs (or ABIs) mean squat for application API stability.

I can run a 2004-era (or older, didn't test recently) Linux app on the latest and greatest Linux system without problems (though vice versa, things often break by the month, so you better build your release binaries on old Linux systems).

The Linux interfaces are important for drivers.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: What's going on?
by RichterKuato on Wed 2nd Nov 2011 15:45 in reply to "RE[4]: What's going on?"
RichterKuato Member since:
2010-05-14

That's not really true. Look beyond the desktop and at mobile and embedded system's you'll see Linux in several commercial products. Many have managed to get around those shortcomings by forking (at least temporarily) the Linux kernel and developing and maintaining a different user space. It just hasn't really happened on the desktop.

Reply Parent Score: 2