Linked by Howard Fosdick on Thu 3rd Nov 2011 04:09 UTC
Internet & Networking A new report confirms what you might have guessed. Netflix downloads hog nearly one third of the internet's bandwidth. "Netflix consumes 32.7 percent of the Internet's peak downstream traffic in North America, and ... continues to be the most powerful driver of evening traffic, and for that matter, of daily traffic overall." The report continues: "...despite some negative subscriber reaction to price hikes, Netflix has continued to increase its presence by adding 1 million U.S. subscribers since the Spring 2011 report, and by many measures Netflix rules North America's fixed access networks."
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the other 2 thirds
by FunkyELF on Thu 3rd Nov 2011 16:45 UTC
FunkyELF
Member since:
2006-07-26

The other 2 thirds must come from torrenting the content that isn't available on NetFlix.

<rant>
I have a PS3 in my living room and a Samsung Bluray player in my bedroom. Both do Netflix, one does vudu, I think one does Hulu Plus but not regular Hulu, and _NEITHER_ do Amazon Video On Demand.

I won't pay $100 a month to have cable or satellite, but I am more than willing to pay $2 an episode to watch shows on Showtime or HBO. Unfortunately when these stupid companies use exclusivity everyone loses. Nobody should have to have 3 different machines hooked up to each TV just to be able to get all the content they want.

I think most pirates are lazy and would pay $2 an episode through some nice interface because it is way easier and more convenient than pirating. Downloading a torrent on a computer, copying it to a thumb drive, go into another room and plug the thumb drive into your PS3/Xbox/Bluray player is a pain in the ass for the consumer and the networks aren't getting any money.
</rant>

Reply Score: 2

RE: the other 2 thirds
by sparkyERTW on Thu 3rd Nov 2011 18:16 in reply to "the other 2 thirds"
sparkyERTW Member since:
2010-06-09

I think most pirates are lazy and would pay $2 an episode through some nice interface because it is way easier and more convenient than pirating.


I don't know about most (maybe, though, who knows), but I agree that plenty of pirating occurs due to the hassle of acquiring content. As a Canadian, I also face the issue of some content not being available. The latest season of Futurama, for example, is not broadcast on any Canadian network, is not yet available in Canadian iTunes (the US guys have it, and even the stuff we do have is over 15% more, which is bulls**t considering the dollar is practically at parity), and we don't have access to Hulu, Vudu, etc. without some VPN service. So unless I want to wait 6-8 months to watch it, what option does that leave me with?

Reply Parent Score: 2