Linked by David Adams on Sun 6th Nov 2011 04:34 UTC
Linux While it may seem like Linux-only projects are betraying their loyal base by developing Windows or OSX versions, I would argue that cross-platform development is actually better for Linux as a whole, better for individual software projects and their developers, and ultimately better for Linux users.
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Comment by Darkmage
by Darkmage on Sun 6th Nov 2011 09:58 UTC
Darkmage
Member since:
2006-10-20

So I can run everything my Linux runs, but have games and proprietary application support too??? How does this help get me off of Windows again? The real answer is Linux needs better Linux only applications. Like Macintosh, the platform has to kick the crap out of Windows in specific areas to drive adoption. Right now it doesn't so it lags behind in marketshare.

Edited 2011-11-06 09:59 UTC

Reply Score: 6

RE: Comment by Darkmage
by Shadowmane on Sun 6th Nov 2011 12:58 in reply to "Comment by Darkmage"
Shadowmane Member since:
2006-06-16

I'm sorry. I think this whole "marketshare" thing is a farce. There is really no telling how many people are on Linux, because adopters of Linux don't buy it. They simply download it and install it on their computers. This skews the numbers when talking about adopters of Linux.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[2]: Comment by Darkmage
by westlake on Sun 6th Nov 2011 17:37 in reply to "RE: Comment by Darkmage"
westlake Member since:
2010-01-07

I'm sorry. I think this whole "marketshare" thing is a farce. There is really no telling how many people are on Linux, because adopters of Linux don't buy it.


But they will go online.

They will download apps from their distro's repository.

Buy a "Humble Bundle" and you be counted as a Linux gamer.

Why do you think the Mozilla Foundation is a Net Applications client?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by Darkmage
by ilovebeer on Sun 6th Nov 2011 17:57 in reply to "RE: Comment by Darkmage"
ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

I'm sorry. I think this whole "marketshare" thing is a farce. There is really no telling how many people are on Linux, because adopters of Linux don't buy it. They simply download it and install it on their computers. This skews the numbers when talking about adopters of Linux.

There's no telling how many people use Windows either but it's certainly a bigger number than reflected in sales figures.

I know certain Linux users really really really want to believe their beloved OS is far more popular than it really is, ....but it's not. The reasons can be whined about/debated til the cows come home but it doesn't change the reality.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by Darkmage
by Soulbender on Mon 7th Nov 2011 21:43 in reply to "RE: Comment by Darkmage"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

This skews the numbers when talking about adopters of Linux.


Sure but not so much that it calls into question Windows status as the mass-market leader.
The question is, does it matter how much market share Linux has?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by Darkmage
by ilovebeer on Sun 6th Nov 2011 17:51 in reply to "Comment by Darkmage"
ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

So I can run everything my Linux runs, but have games and proprietary application support too??? How does this help get me off of Windows again? The real answer is Linux needs better Linux only applications. Like Macintosh, the platform has to kick the crap out of Windows in specific areas to drive adoption. Right now it doesn't so it lags behind in marketshare.

Someone who gets it.. Yes, exactly right and why Linux will continue to not be taken seriously as at least a desktop os by anyone beyond Linux enthusiasts.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by Darkmage
by unclefester on Mon 7th Nov 2011 06:50 in reply to "RE: Comment by Darkmage"
unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

In a few years the average "desktop" will probably be an (Android) phone or tablet that uses a docking station that provides power, a keyboard, a mouse and monitor. The software will be web based and the storage cloud based.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by Darkmage
by Wafflez on Mon 7th Nov 2011 16:32 in reply to "RE: Comment by Darkmage"
Wafflez Member since:
2011-06-26

Because of the ideologistic morons, I agree! Untill they'll chant their "not GPL - not in my pc" mantra, Linux can go fsck itself.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE: Comment by Darkmage
by Soulbender on Mon 7th Nov 2011 21:40 in reply to "Comment by Darkmage"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Like Macintosh, the platform has to kick the crap out of Windows in specific areas to drive adoption.


It already does although not in areas that matter for the large masses.

Right now it doesn't so it lags behind in marketshare.


It's perfectly possible to be leading in specific areas without being the overall marketshare leader. In fact, that is usually the case.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by Darkmage
by reconciliation on Tue 8th Nov 2011 14:17 in reply to "Comment by Darkmage"
reconciliation Member since:
2009-07-02

"So I can run everything my Linux runs, but have games and proprietary application support too??? How does this help get me off of Windows again?"

If you want games and proprietary application support you will use Windows anyway. It helps with adoption because more and more applications you might use (pidgin, gimp, audacity, f.lux, open/libreoffice, vlc, ...) will be known to you if you ever use Linux or try it out. And that will make you feel more comfortable with it.

Obviously they're not a reason to switch. But they take away a big reason not to switch.
What Linux needs imho is more streamlined gui based configuration. For example if you have a 5.1 system and you want to set up a system wide equalizer or delays for your speakers you have to be a guru in writing asoundrc or you can just forget about it. There are some good gui configuration things like wicd but there are a lot of holes because most people eventually get to editing configuration files and nobody is motivated to try to unify the inconsistent mess.
The ability to run games will come soon enough and is already there for many games. (I could play mass effect 2 days after it was released, although I had to patch wine and recompile it for that)

Linux Mint is doing really good work with consistency and taking away little pains and adding little features (like an "upload to ..." context menu item in nautilus or what it was)

Then there is also missing features/applications that make people turn back. Or hard to find applications. You can spend a lot of time to find an application that does what you want if you don't know what it is called. So if you know that application from Windows or Mac already you will more easily feel "at home". So in that sense cross-platform applications do a great service to Linux. They also attract more developers and familiarize them with cross-platform coding.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Comment by zima
by zima on Sun 13th Nov 2011 23:59 in reply to "Comment by Darkmage"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

So I can run everything my Linux runs, but have games and proprietary application support too??? How does this help get me off of Windows again? The real answer is Linux needs better Linux only applications. Like Macintosh, the platform has to kick the crap out of Windows in specific areas to drive adoption. Right now it doesn't so it lags behind in marketshare.

Well TBH - you're irrelevant. I am, too. When talking about some respectable (not outright dominating, or some other silliness like that; first things first ;p ) market share, it matters only if the thing will be good enough for large enough group of people.

When I look at how the "average user" people around me use PCs - it turns out most of them aren't into Windows games at all (and out of those who aren't, the subgroup playing browser/etc. games seems bigger than "true PC gamers").
Also, while they technically do rely on "proprietary application support" - in large part (I think easily more than half...) it boils down to the browser, IM client, media player, and office suite (in many cases the last is already OOo/Libre Office, my place leads in their adoption as is - but TBH, when I sometimes see how people use Writer or Word (yes, that's also about large part of those who are convinced they "require" MS Office), something between Wordpad and Abiword would be more than enough for them)

They aren't really tied to the OS already (plus most don't use the OS per se, they just want from it to get out of their way) And while, in their cases, even habits could prevent that - there are still ~5 billion people who are not PC users - quite a space to grow among them. Coincidentally, they are the people who would appreciate lower costs the most (when underlying OS won't matter so much, something like not-in-your-way-LXDE might do fine - that's even one of their goals, to target inexpensive ARM-class hardware)

Edited 2011-11-14 00:19 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2